Old  June 7th, 2005, 11:02pm     #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thundermace2000
Try the system restore ... i posted how to do this in another thread but being it may be a virus there are a few things about windows XP that make it more difficult to get rid of one.

1. The system restore points can be infected.

2. Even if you removed the virus, Windows XP uses something called a prefetch. It caches programs in memory prior to loading to give programs the appearance of running and loading faster. Virus tend to get into the Prefetch and re-infect a cleaned computer. To ensure that a virus does not re-infect, go to the c:\Windows\Prefetch folder and delete all the files in it. The will recreate themselves as you use programs. It also speeds the boot process by deleting these files periodically.

3. If the virus is self propigating it may have entered itself into the startup files on your PC. To ensure this is not the case you will need to examine the START -> Programs -> Startup folder for any unusual entries. Also in the registry there is a hidden startup called the run folder. This is where normal helper programs run from when the system is booted. these helper programs are usually located near the clock as icons. But it seems your a novice so I wont tell you how to access the registry directly because you can also damage your pc severely. So get the HIjackthis! program and get a scan and post the results. I will then be able to tell what is say to remove and what is not.

4. There is a free utility from McAfee that scans for and removes most major Pain viruses. It is free and it is called Stinger. To use this download and execute. It will scan the entire contents of the PC for any known PAIN in THE BUTT Viruses and remove them.

5. The next pain in the ASS caused by Windows XP is the fact that each user has his own profile located in Documents and Settings. If it is a Internet type virus it may infect multiple profiles. Stinger should catch this but if you are not using such a program you can miss this as well.

Hope all this information helps you so you dont have to reformat.
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  Old  September 6th, 2005, 2:03pm     #62
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Thumbs up Links to understanding puter terms.
www.understandtech.com/

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  Old  September 6th, 2005, 2:58pm     #63
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Lightbulb Hardware Tips: Prepare for a Windows Reinstall
Sometimes the only way to rid your PC of rogue software and other
maladies is to revamp your Windows installation. Follow these four
tips to keep your hardware on good terms with your reinvigorated
Windows setup.

Get Your Discs in a Row

Before you begin, gather the CDs containing the device drivers Windows
will require to run your computer, printer, and other hardware. Almost
every component in or connected to your PC needs to have its own
device-driver program installed in Windows. This includes printers,
graphics cards, network adapters, and even individual chips on your
system's motherboard.

All of the drivers your PC needs may or may not be included on the
Windows CD (or on the restoration disc) that came with your system.
After recently reinstalling Windows XP on my Dell Dimension, I found
that the machine's OS CD failed to install my network drivers and
other key hardware drivers, which meant that initially I had no
Internet access. Since I had lost the disc holding my network card's
driver, I had to use another PC to connect to the Web and download the
necessary program from the maker's site. Many drivers--such as those
for equipment you bought separately--may have to be installed from
their own discs, so keep all of your software CDs handy.

If you're reinstalling Windows from a standard Microsoft Windows CD
rather than from the disc that shipped with your PC, don't assume that
the generic Windows CD will have all of your system's current drivers.
Visit the support sections at the Web sites of your PC and peripheral
manufacturers, download up-to-date drivers, and save them on removable
media (the reinstallation will likely wipe these updates off your hard
drive).

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  Old  September 6th, 2005, 2:59pm     #64
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Lightbulb Check Out an Overview
Stan Miastkowski's December 2002 "Step-By-Step" provides a
start-to-finish look at the Windows-reinstallation process:
http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article...,tk,urx,00.asp

To transfer all of your current Windows settings to the new
configuration, consult Lincoln Spector's September 2003 "Answer Line":
http://www.pcworld.com/howto/article...,tk,urx,00.asp

Avoid Hardware Activation

Every time you reinstall Windows XP, you have to phone home to
Microsoft to reactivate the OS. Avoid this annoyance by copying the
existing hardware signature file that Windows creates from your
computer's configuration and pasting it back into the freshly
installed version of Windows XP.

Open the C:\Windows\System32 folder in Explorer and copy the files
"wpa.dbl" and "wpa.bak" to a floppy disk, CD, or other removable
medium. At the end of the XP reinstallation, choose not to reactivate
Windows. When the reinstallation finishes, reboot your PC in Safe Mode
by pressing F8 before Windows launches. Once Windows has opened in
Safe Mode, copy the two files over the new versions in the
C:\Windows\System32 folder.

Note: This works only on the PC where the "wpa.dbl" file was
originally created; it won't bypass Windows XP activation on other
computers. And if you made significant hardware changes to your PC
before reinstalling Windows XP, you'll probably have to reactivate the
OS anyway.

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  Old  September 6th, 2005, 3:00pm     #65
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Lightbulb Do a Driver Check
Finally, check Device Manager to confirm that all of your drivers were
installed. In XP and 2000, right-click My Computer, click Manage, and
select Device Manager on the left of the screen. In 98 and Me,
right-click My Computer, select Properties, and click Device Manager.
Any entry marked with an exclamation point (!) in a yellow circle (or
a white question mark in a green circle in Windows Me) has a problem;
if you're lucky, a new driver will fix it.

For more ways to keep your PC humming along, go to PC World's Upgrade
Center and scroll down to the "Tips & Tricks" section:
http://www.pcworld.com/resource/info...,tk,urx,00.asp

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  Old  September 6th, 2005, 3:02pm     #66
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Lightbulb Read Kirk Steers' regularly published "Hardware Tips" columns:
http://www.pcworld.com/resource/colu...4,tk,ur,00.asp

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  Old  September 8th, 2005, 2:34pm     #67
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Thumbs up FastStone Image Viewer
FastStone Image Viewer lets you browse and view your images in a
Windows-Explorer-like interface. FastStone image viewer supports all
major image formats, including BMP, GIF, ICO, JPEG, JPEG2000, PCX,
PNG, PSD, TAF, TIF, and WMF; it includes EXIF metadata support as
well. You can crop, resize, flip, rotate, and adjust colors on your
images and compare them side by side.
You can convert your images from one format to another; you can even
convert or resize your photos in batches. If you need to take a closer
look without resizing, use the Full Screen image viewer to zoom in and
size things up with the clear magnifier. Once you're done, you can
apply over 150 transitional effects in a slide show.

Version: 2.12
Price: Free

Download FastStone Image Viewer now at:
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/fil...,tk,hsx,00.asp

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  Old  September 8th, 2005, 11:30pm     #68
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Lightbulb Sygate Personal Firewall
Protect your data from hackers and prevent unauthorized access to your
files from inside your network with Sygate Personal Firewall.

You can adjust Sygate Personal Firewall's settings regarding
applications, trusted IP addresses, ports, protocols, and scheduling
to secure many types of network configurations or requirements. Its
online tools can check your system and locate security
vulnerabilities. These active scans report the number, nature, and
severity of system-security risks. You can then adjust the security
status of your system at any time and audit the effectiveness of your
entire system-security policy.

Version: 5.6
Price: Free

Download Sygate Personal Firewall now at:
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/fil...,tk,hsx,00.asp

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  Old  September 8th, 2005, 11:33pm     #69
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Lightbulb Real Alternative
This player plays RealAudio (.ra and .rpm) and RealMedia (.rm, .ram,
.rmvb, .rpx) files just like RealPlayer and RealOne Player do. It
offers limited support for Real's .smi and .smil formats. Real
Alternative's RealMedia browser plug-in supports Internet Explorer,
Mozilla, Netscape, and Opera.

Version: 1.32
Price: Free

Download Real Alternative now at:
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/fil...,tk,hsx,00.asp

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  Old  September 8th, 2005, 11:35pm     #70
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Lightbulb ZoneAlarm Free
ZoneAlarm lets you block uninitiated and unwanted traffic, even while
your PC is unattended or while you're not using your connection. You
can also limit your exposure to attack by specifying which
applications can access the Internet. The program also lets you stop
e-mail-borne Visual Basic Script worms.

Version: 5.5
Price: Free

Download ZoneAlarm Free now at:
http://www.pcworld.com/downloads/fil...,tk,hsx,00.asp

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  Old  September 9th, 2005, 8:03am     #71
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Thumbs up What does "IP" stand for?
A:
Outside the computer world, IP sometimes stands for Intellectual Property.

In computer lingo, IP stands for "Internet Protocol". You'll often see it paired with TCP, "Transmission Control Protocol." Together, TCP/IP allow two different computers to talk back and forth over the internet.

Every computer and server (email servers, IP hosts) has an IP address.The IP address acts like a return postal address stamped on packets of data that your computer sends through the internet.

IP addresses are made of four numbers separated by periods, for example, 69.44.18.176. This stamp on data sent through the net tells receiving computers what country, service provider, host, and computer sent the info.

Some routers and software can make you anonymous over the internet by masking your IP address. In addition, less scrupulous computer masters can take control of a remote computer and thus have that computer's IP (return address) stamped on their evildoings.

See the following for more info:
http://www.worldstart.com/tips/tips.php/1316

Want to find out your IP address? Check out http://www.showip.org



Have a question for the newsletter? Submit it at the link below:
http://www.worldstart.com/submitquestion.htm

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  Old  September 9th, 2005, 8:08am     #72
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Thumbs up Improve the Quality of Graphics in AOL
If you browse the web with AOL, you know that sometimes graphics just donít look so purdy. Never fear! I'm here to show you how to turn off the built in image compression.

AOL says this image compression helps images download faster. Blah! This may be, but a typical human can't see any significant difference in speed between having compression on vs off. In fact, the only thing this Image Compression seems to be good at is converting nice looking graphics and photos into something that appears to have gotten messed up in Captain Kirk's transporter. Sometimes it prevents server-based graphics from reaching you at all (ever wonder why you get red Xs all the time?)

I'll walk you through how to turn this off, but note that I'm using AOL 7.0. If you use AOL 6 (or even 5), there shouldn't be any major differences in the way this works. Newer AOL (8 and 9) work pretty much the same way.

1) Log On to AOL.

2) Go to Keyword: Preferences **See below for newer AOL instructions

3) Under the Organization Menu, click the Internet Properties WWW link. Your AOL Internet Properties Panel will pop up.

**With AOL 8 & 9 go to Settings/Preferences/Internet Settings

4) There are several tabs to choose from. Choose the Web Graphics Tab.

5) By default, Always Compress Graphics should be selected. If you enjoy crisp clear graphics, choose the Never Compress Graphics option.



6) Click "OK"

Congrats! Your graphics should be lookin' good from now on.

NOTE: Another benefit of choosing "Never Compress Graphics" is that you can save images from web pages as JPEG files rather than compressed AOL images (.art files) that few graphic programs can support.

~Steve

If you enjoy our tips, tell your friends. That's what keeps this newsletter growing.
http://www.worldstart.com/referafriend.htm

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  Old  September 12th, 2005, 8:53pm     #73
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Thumbs up Free Help on the Net
Microsoft's Support

Knowledge Base http://support.microsoft.com/search
When Windows misbehaves or you are stumped on how to use a Microsoft application feature, your first stop should be Microsoft's Knowledge Base. Search using keywords or error messages: Most of the help is great step-by-step advice, but don't expect to find the answer you need every time.


JSI FAQ www.jsifaq.com
Jerold Schulman offers thousands of no-nonsense tips about the Windows NT, 2000, and XP platforms. Search by keyword or check out Today's Tips and Recent Tips. Detailed instructions help tweak Windows and solve problems. The home page (www.jsiinc.com) includes a link to Microsoft's excellent Windows XP Expert Zone Community.

Inside Outlook Express http://insideoe.tomsterdam.com
We have featured this venerable site before and continue to recommend it. You'll find news, including bug fixes, update reports, and frequently reported problems. For discussion groups, the site steers you to MSnews, which is Microsoft's public news server.

Slipstick Systems www.slipstick.com/outlook
If Microsoft Outlook is your favorite e-mail program, turn to Slipstick for help. Beginners are welcome, and the site is rich with update information, tips on customization, and articles on how to manage your mail. Like Inside Outlook Express, Slipstick sends you to MSnews for discussion groups.

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  Old  September 12th, 2005, 8:55pm     #74
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Thumbs up Free Help on the Net--# 2
ExtremeTech www.extremetech.com
You might assume that Ziff Davis's ExtremeTech is too technical, but don't be intimidated. The site offers plenty of straightforward information and advice from experts, hardware and software reviews, how-to articles, and busy discussion forums. Often just browsing questions by topic is enough to find the information you need. It helps to know the configuration of your computer system, because if you post here, members will ask.

PC Magazine http://go.pcmag.com/solutions , http://go.pcmag.com/usertouser
We hate to toot our own horn, but we find our searchable Solutions and User to User sections fantastically useful.


TechRepublic http://techrepublic.com
TechRepublic is an information and help site for IT professionals and power users. It offers downloads, including printable keyboard shortcuts for Microsoft applications, articles from popular computer authors, and tips for networking professionals. You'll also find discussion forums with useful advice, links to blogs, and white papers.

Tech Support Guy www.helponthe.net
Mike the Tech Support Guy started this site as an antidote to overpriced technical support. His volunteers include everyday people who love computers and contribute often. The site is very simple to use, but you'll find some irrelevant information. Read the rules, search the forums, and register to post messages. With almost 200,000 members, Tech Support Guy is sure to have a hint or two.

WhatIs.com http://whatis.techtarget.com
WhatIs.com is part of the SearchTechTarget universe, a database search portal for IT professionals. Its growing encyclopedia is the place to visit if geek-speak is getting you down. Search by keyword or category, or alphabetically.

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  Old  September 12th, 2005, 8:56pm     #75
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Thumbs up Free Help on the Net--# 3
PC Mechanic www.pcmech.com
PC Mechanic promises plain-English information, with tutorials on tasks from installing a new device to building an entire computer. The site offers online content, for-fee downloads, a CD for off-line work and troubleshooting, an e-mail newsletter, and help forums.

TweakTown www.tweaktown.com
TweakTown is all about hardware. It covers overclocking, BIOS tuning, multimedia, and even mobile phones. If you're looking for advice on how to cool your screaming motherboard or for information on graphics card incompatibilities, this is a good site to check out.

SpywareInfo www.spywareinfo.com
No matter your expertise in diagnosing computer problems, you will need this up-to-date information on how to rescue your hijacked computer. Sign up for the newsletter and don't forget to visit the forums for security warnings, general information, reports on privacy invasion, and what to do after you remove spyware.

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