Old  March 6th, 2016, 11:16am     #16
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Originally Posted by Cajun_Mum View Post
Probably a stupid question, but can't you just buy some fingerling potatoes, let them sprout and plant them?
We grew garlic last winter and we just used the fresh garlic from the local fruit and veggie store.
Also, we found all sorts of potatoes to plant at Home Depot.
I did that before, but they recommend seed potatoes because of viruses. I just bought some yesterday and now I need to chit or sprout them . I had to go to 2 nurseries to get the seed potatoes. At my seed exchange yesterday, they recommended Johnny seed catalog, which is free they said, to get. I have spring fever. At our garden orientation, they said no vaping, no smoking and no Marijuana smoking as a new rule, in the gardens. I live in Colorado. Our city, voted for no public smoking in any city parks or lands.

Marijuana has sure changed things in Colorado. The reason I voted in favor of it, has not happened. I thought it would become more highly regulated and safer to use but several grow nurseries have had tainted weed they have sold to people. They have had to recall what was not consumed.
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  Old  March 6th, 2016, 2:19pm     #17
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I'm a groundskeeper at a very posh retirement community. I am now in charge of the green house and planting flowerbeds and vegetable gardens for the residents. I have been planting seeds like crazy, marigolds, zinnia, moonflowers, etc.. A couple of months ago I planted over 60 pecan trees in pots, they looked like small sticks with some roots. I have now moved them outside to make room for all the trays of seeds I've planted. The guys are digging the holes out in our pecan orchard for the new trees.

I've got 9 raised beds in one area. I planted Texas wildflowers in one, and southern wildflowers in another. I plan on planting Zinnias in another. These flowers will be for the residents to pick for vases and such.

I love this job!! I'm learning so many things. I went by Lowes yesterday and got some of the plastic trays that they recycle back to the nursery. Since they know me from my previous career, they had no problem giving them to me and will save the smaller pots for me as well. I am going to plant my own tomato plant out by the green house. I have tried for several years to grow one at home but not enough sun. I ended up with really pretty tall plants but no tomatoes.

I will be visiting this thread often, thanks!!

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  Old  March 6th, 2016, 2:51pm     #18
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So the fingerling potatoes at the grocery store could contain viruses. So, they are good enough to eat, but not good enough to plant??? That's messed up.

My wins
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  Old  March 22nd, 2016, 3:11pm     #19
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Originally Posted by sweepmama View Post
I'm a groundskeeper at a very posh retirement community. I am now in charge of the green house and planting flowerbeds and vegetable gardens for the residents. I have been planting seeds like crazy, marigolds, zinnia, moonflowers, etc.. A couple of months ago I planted over 60 pecan trees in pots, they looked like small sticks with some roots. I have now moved them outside to make room for all the trays of seeds I've planted. The guys are digging the holes out in our pecan orchard for the new trees.
...

I will be visiting this thread often, thanks!!
How cool! Especially the pecan trees.

I am looking for advice for what type of fertilizer to put on my indoor lemon tree. Some of the leaves are beginning to turn yellow. It produced a crop of 9 lemons a bit ago and it is on its second batch now. Looking for health organic fertilizers.

Found this link for ways to creatively use what we produce. Particularly liked the whey drinks on page 17 I think, as well as what to use in making bitters: http://onlinedigeditions.com/publication/?i=290332

Happy Producing All!

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  Old  March 23rd, 2016, 12:49pm     #20
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I enjoy reading the Gardening Threads to see what everyone grows. Since moving from the Midwest to the Arizona desert I have given up on traditional gardening. Now I am tending to my citrus trees. We have one pink grapefruit tree, a tangelo tree, a lemon tree. They were here when we bought this house. That was one of my "must haves" when home shopping. Three years ago we planted a 3 ft naval orange tree and this is the first year we had one fully ripe orange. They are all blooming now for next year's fruit and the scent is just wonderful
Oh, that sounds heavenly, and your photo is awesome. I often wonder about gardening in the desert - I would love to hear more about what you're growing, how you're adapting your style for the area, your pest and beneficial bugs, etc.

I grow citrus outside in pots and move it indoors every winter. I have different varieties of oranges, limes, lemons and a few calamondins. My largest is 3.5 to 4 feet tall (I prune them to stay a size we can move through the doors and house).

Here's a pic (from 2014) of one of my Persian limes - it's the variety commonly found in grocery stores. They're sold when they're green, but when they're completely ripe they're yellow.

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  Old  March 23rd, 2016, 1:23pm     #21
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Originally Posted by sweepmama View Post
I'm a groundskeeper at a very posh retirement community. I am now in charge of the green house and planting flowerbeds and vegetable gardens for the residents. I have been planting seeds like crazy, marigolds, zinnia, moonflowers, etc.. A couple of months ago I planted over 60 pecan trees in pots, they looked like small sticks with some roots. I have now moved them outside to make room for all the trays of seeds I've planted. The guys are digging the holes out in our pecan orchard for the new trees.

I've got 9 raised beds in one area. I planted Texas wildflowers in one, and southern wildflowers in another. I plan on planting Zinnias in another. These flowers will be for the residents to pick for vases and such...

I love this job!! I'm learning so many things. I went by Lowes yesterday and got some of the plastic trays that they recycle back to the nursery. Since they know me from my previous career, they had no problem giving them to me and will save the smaller pots for me as well. I am going to plant my own tomato plant out by the green house. I have tried for several years to grow one at home but not enough sun. I ended up with really pretty tall plants but no tomatoes.

I will be visiting this thread often, thanks!!
I totally 1000% want your job.

Behind every successful woman is a tribe of other successful women who have her back. #TeamTopKnot
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  Old  March 23rd, 2016, 2:02pm     #22
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I grow citrus outside in pots and move it indoors every winter. I have different varieties of oranges, limes, lemons and a few calamondins. My largest is 3.5 to 4 feet tall (I prune them to stay a size we can move through the doors and house).

Here's a pic (from 2014) of one of my Persian limes - it's the variety commonly found in grocery stores. They're sold when they're green, but when they're completely ripe they're yellow.
Great pic!
Wondering what you use to fertilize yours. Mine are producing but I haven't figured out how to organically fertilize them.
I think I will be able to move mine outdoors this summer. Will have to look at good temps for them.

Wishing & hoping & thinking & praying, planning & dreaming... and entering!
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  Old  March 23rd, 2016, 2:30pm     #23
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...
I am looking for advice for what type of fertilizer to put on my indoor lemon tree. Some of the leaves are beginning to turn yellow. It produced a crop of 9 lemons a bit ago and it is on its second batch now. Looking for health organic fertilizers...
I use an organic fertilizer made for citrus and avocados, and also the same organic fish emulsion that I use on my heirloom tomatoes. I don't recall the brand names, but I buy it at local nurseries and sometimes big box stores have it. I use it sparingly because too much nitrogen will encourage leaf growth but discourage flowers, which obviously you need for the tree or plant to make fruit.

Also, with yellow leaves on citrus check for over-watering and pests including scale. I once had scale on one of my lime trees; here is a conversation from the Gardening 2015 thread about scale and how to get rid of it:

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Originally Posted by Qncterra View Post
I could use some help with my citrus trees. Two years ago, I almost lost both my pink grapefruit and the Valencia orange tree. I didn't see any of the classic signs of signs citrus greening, but the tress were in shock and behaved the same, dropping a lot of leaves, massive die back and pear shaped fruit. The first year, I paid $100 for commercial treatment, but with little result, so I started with liquid food and a mixture of water, peroxide and natural oil. This third year, the grapefruit tree is doing better and normal shaped fruit, but the oranges are the size of lemons and die back is continuing. I am close to cutting it down, so any advice is appreciated.
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QNCTERRA, here are a few thoughts that ran through my mind... it sounds like some of the symptoms of HLB (oddly shaped fruit, die back, etc.), except you say there's no sign of greening. How do the leaves look? Are they mottled, curled, sticky or moldy? (Numerous types of infestation show these symptoms, including psyllid.) On the other hand, there's no cure for HLB and your grapefruit seems a little better, so hmm...

Have you looked super-up-close for scale? They can blend in with the bark. I had it once on one of my small (3-4 ft) lime trees and treated it with natural oil (several times), pruned the damaged limbs and changed the soil (once it was out of shock), and it slowly came back to health. Maybe it's scale or some other parasite that doesn't fare well with the oil, and that's why your tree responded after you treated it yourself? Also, have you done a soil test?

Maybe you can get help from one of the University of Florida Local Extension Offices. On their website it says: "Got a gardening question? Contact your local office for free, research-based gardening and landscape information."

This is the link to find your local extension:
http://sfyl.ifas.ufl.edu/map/index.shtml

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  Old  March 23rd, 2016, 11:07pm     #24
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I use an organic fertilizer made for citrus and avocados, and also the same organic fish emulsion that I use on my heirloom tomatoes. I don't recall the brand names, but I buy it at local nurseries and sometimes big box stores have it. I use it sparingly because too much nitrogen will encourage leaf growth but discourage flowers, which obviously you need for the tree or plant to make fruit.

Also, with yellow leaves on citrus check for over-watering and pests including scale. I once had scale on one of my lime trees; here is a conversation from the Gardening 2015 thread about scale and how to get rid of it:
Well I know I do not OVER water so will check for pests/scale tomorrow in the better light.

TY for the fertilizer info. I used to have indoor plants decades ago and none were edibles!

Wishing & hoping & thinking & praying, planning & dreaming... and entering!
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  Old  March 24th, 2016, 10:27am     #25
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Another possibility... My citrus trees are all productive year-round, but I've noticed that every couple of years one or another of them will take a rest - it will drop leaves and stop producing flowers or new growth for a season. My oldest calamondin does this every 4-5 years, and last winter one of my lemons took a break for the first time.

In other news, my gardenia is putting out buds for the second year in a row, but shhh - gardenias are temperamental so if I say it too loud it might hear and change its mind just to spite me.

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  Old  March 24th, 2016, 11:51am     #26
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In other news, my gardenia is putting out buds for the second year in a row, but shhh - gardenias are temperamental so if I say it too loud it might hear and change its mind just to spite me.
Mums the word <---- whispering

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  Old  March 24th, 2016, 3:19pm     #27
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Probably a stupid question, but can't you just buy some fingerling potatoes, let them sprout and plant them?
We grew garlic last winter and we just used the fresh garlic from the local fruit and veggie store.
Also, we found all sorts of potatoes to plant at Home Depot.
So the fingerling potatoes at the grocery store could contain viruses. So, they are good enough to eat, but not good enough to plant??? That's messed up. Unquote



I've read and learned a lot over 27 years of gardening. They say that buying supermarket potatoes can be trouble because they are not "Certified " disease free. Most potatoes are also sprayed with chemicals to discourage sprouting. What I've observed is sometimes I still get market potatoes that not only sprout, but will grow in the compost or ground. I have tried just planting store bought spuds one year and had a very poor yield. On the other hand, I've never tried planting organic spuds from the store. I would think they couldn't spray them with chemicals and still call them organic. I've also grown spuds from certified disease- free potatoes and still had a few come up with hollow heart and other diseases.

As for eating potatoes that may carry some disease that isn't visible, These diseases are harmful to ONLY the nightshade family and not to humans.

Last edited by cigi; March 24th, 2016 at 3:23pm. Reason: copied text from other posts didn't separate out in the body of my message
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  Old  March 28th, 2016, 7:51pm     #28
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Gardening has official begun here. Hubby spread some grass seeds where the topsoil pile once stood. No more brown landing pad on our front lawn

Started the wave petunias in the wooden homemade coffin. Heated with a 30+ year old waterbed heater and lit with old florescent light (newer bulb)

And 200 peas into the garden patch encased in rabbit-proof (hopefully) fencing.
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  Old  March 31st, 2016, 12:02pm     #29
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  Old  March 31st, 2016, 12:27pm     #30
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Our peonies have emerged, many plants are leafing out (mints, lavender, currants...), there are violets everywhere and my new quince tree was delivered today.

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