Old  May 31st, 2007, 2:16pm     #91
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home schooling
Where are the best places to buy supplies? Actually we found the basic's at Wally's world. More educational material at Clas E Professor and Barnes and Nobles

Sharing ideaís on different projects that you have done that worked and didnít. Can't say we had any that didn't work. You can even turn a grocery shopping trip into a lesson for math, chemisty, ect.

What companies do the best job with there educational materials. Don't have a favorite

Discounts or sales from certain venders . Since I did not work with bulk, I used my discount at Barnes and Nobles (I write and perform weddings so they gave me their rev discount, even though I am not one.)

Helping out if people are having troubles teaching a subject to there child. Offer suggestions on a different styles to try or products that may have helped you. I would have to know the situation

Special projects that you have done that you felt were particularly fun and educational. Loved just walking in the park. It became a science lesson, and/or what ever the conversation lead us to.

Any experiences good or bad from Homeschooling. The bad part was the crap I got from the teachers in my family.

Any special funding for homeschooling. When I home schooled there were none.

What have you done to help keep your kids around other kids (socializing?). Neighbor hood children, some extra activities at the local school (one friend had her son in the school band, mine played sports). There is also church (if you go to one), girl/boy scots.

Why did you decide to homeschool? I hated the way they treated the children in the public schools out here. What I called factory line education.

Good luck with you adventure - it is well worth the time and effort.
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  Old  August 1st, 2007, 12:09pm     #92
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I want to homeschool, how do you convince the kids?

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  Old  August 1st, 2007, 1:54pm     #93
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgdahl
I want to homeschool, how do you convince the kids?
For us we didn't give them a choice we are the parents and made the decision.
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  Old  August 1st, 2007, 3:34pm     #94
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What inkyskyyyy said and trips to the zoo during the animal discussion days, trips to the museums, trips to historical event locations, ect.

My son is going on educational "field trips " to Russia, Greece, British Columbia this year. We are hoping for Brazil too but I am not sure if that one will happen.

When he did his historical guided trip to Italy last year, he learned more than what he learned in the book he studied from.
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  Old  August 1st, 2007, 10:25pm     #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgdahl
I want to homeschool, how do you convince the kids?
I agree that you should make the decision, but it is nice if you can get them to see the advantages in it (which are many). How old are your kids? If they are older and have been going to public schools for a long time it might be hard to get them to see the advantages. The one on one you have with them is can make a huge difference in how well they learn something.

I know my son can get up later (no bus ride, he would have to get up a 6:30 to catch the bus at 8:00 to be to school at 9:15) and is done with his school work a lot sooner then when he went to public school. Plus no bus ride home which means a lot more play time for him.

You can also structure your learning materials around things that they are interested in. In class usually everything is structured or taught one way. At home you can individualize it and make it more interesting for them to learn and understand a subject. My son likes to cook with his mom, so she lets him measure out the ingredients and this helps him learn fractions (plus he gets to lick the bowl) and how to cook.

But probably just telling them they will be able to sleep in longer will do it.
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  Old  August 1st, 2007, 10:33pm     #96
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Originally Posted by wackydackydoo
I only use A-Beka curriculum. They are based out of Pensacola Christian College and have teachers for support.

They offer discounts at their "shows" when they sell the curriculum around the country.

There is no homeschool funding.

I do it because I want a christian-based content and do not want them subjected to public schools and their behavioral courses and lacking academics. Plus I do not want them around "today's" public school youth.

Homeschoolers have more socialization than public school children. There are always activity groups based in most areas to get together for fun, special activities, field trips, etc.

And the biggest plus, overall, they turn out to be more well-mannered, well-rounded, more respectful, better educated, etc., youths and adults. Plus, colleges and universities have been putting homeschoolers more and more ahead on the list before public shool children since they are better educated and less likely to require remediation classes.
Oh Puhleeze. Where are you getting your information from? Let's see some statistics.

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  Old  August 2nd, 2007, 9:56am     #97
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Kathleen, I teach college freshman English and I've had many students who came from homeschools. None of these students have ever been in a remediation course, while about 40% of the (public school) students are.

I think there are good homeschoolers and bad homeschoolers. I don't think you can say that ALL homeschools are better, but let's face it - learning 1 on 1 is much more beneficial to a student than learning at the same pace as everyone else, 27 to 1. There is a give and take with homeschool and with public schools - neither one is completely perfect.

No stats, just my opinion.

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  Old  August 2nd, 2007, 10:50am     #98
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We got the test results a couple of weeks ago from our first year homeschooling. They all did well and tested above their grade levels. We are going to home school again this year since last year was a success!
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  Old  August 2nd, 2007, 12:56pm     #99
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Thank you Ron, for starting this thread.We are seriously considering homeschooling our 9 yr. old DS. - Something I NEVER thought i would want to do! I and DH are products of 12 years of Catholic school and that is what we wanted for our kids too! Aside from being so expensive, we are finding that the school is just not equipped to respond to a child with special needs! Our son has ADHD and we have had so much trouble even getting the simplest of accomodations for him! Even though the public schools in our area are quite good, we are wary of the crazy agendas that seem to be cropping up in public schools over the last 10-15 years!

So here I am thinking, can I do this? Is this the right decision? I'll be up front and say that I was really looking forward to the day when all three kids were in school and I could have a little time to myself! But I'm also finding myself feeling a little bit excited and challenged by the thought of being able to help my son learn the way HE needs to. I am researching Catholic curriculums and Seton seems to be the most well-known.

One more question for the general homeschool population on OLS- there seem to be several types of curriculums to choose from. Some are actual schools that offer something like "distance learning" (they do everything but teach), some provide the full curriculum and books but don't grade or keep records, and some seem to be very loose providers of materials and support for those that sort of "wing it". Do I have it right? I'd like to know what kind you prefer and why? Would you post your good and bad experiences with different companies? Thanks! Deanna

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  Old  August 2nd, 2007, 1:20pm     #100
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Quote:
Originally Posted by indyskyyyy
For us we didn't give them a choice we are the parents and made the decision.

That's how I feel.

I have one that wants to be homeschooled and the other does not want homeschooling until there are problems at school.

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  Old  August 3rd, 2007, 1:20am     #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DE-termined
One more question for the general homeschool population on OLS- there seem to be several types of curriculums to choose from. Some are actual schools that offer something like "distance learning" (they do everything but teach), some provide the full curriculum and books but don't grade or keep records, and some seem to be very loose providers of materials and support for those that sort of "wing it". Do I have it right? I'd like to know what kind you prefer and why? Would you post your good and bad experiences with different companies? Thanks! Deanna
There are basically two ways you can go with materials: the "curriculum in a box" or separate materials that you've chosen. A lot of people find the boxed sets easier because you get the complete curriculum for your child's grade level in one simple order. Its a lot easier than planning and selecting a program for each subject. My son is advanced in some areas and on grade level in others, so I had to select and order texts and materials for each subject. The gigantic selection can be overwhelming.

There are many quality religious-based programs available if that's what you're interested in. I homeschool through a public school district and they will not fund any religious materials. You might want to check with your program before ordering.

I have ordered from rainbowresource.com several times. The service has been excellent, and most items are discounted. They are Christian homeschoolers, but their huge catalog- about 1300 pages- offers secular materials as well. Its always mentioned in the product description if the item is religious in nature. You can also shop online or request catalogs from national textbook companies. I've used Houghton Mifflin for several subjects. One nice thing about ordering textbooks from companies like HM, Steck-Vaughn, McGraw Hill, and Scott Foresman is that the curriculum is standards-based because they sell to public schools.

As far as reporting requirements, they vary from state-to-state. Alaska's pretty loose. You can homeschool independently, but you won't receive any funding. Three programs in my area provide a financial allotment. The school district will provide materials and guidance but no funding for supplemental materials a parent may want to purchase. You might want to see if there's a homeschool group in your area. They could provide information about which options are available in your area. In my program children are graded by their parents until they're in high school. Test scores determine their high school grades.

Good luck, and I hope this helps.
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  Old  August 3rd, 2007, 9:52am     #102
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pandka
We got the test results a couple of weeks ago from our first year homeschooling. They all did well and tested above their grade levels. We are going to home school again this year since last year was a success!
Congrats!!
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  Old  August 3rd, 2007, 11:44am     #103
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With curriculum you will find you will use different methods. A live and learn as you go. I started with School of Tomorrow curriculum but then started mixing and matching curriculum and then I found Life Pac curriculum that we really liked much better. I just wished I had found it a lot sooner.

It comes with each subject in it's own box with 10 lesson books in each subject some only have 5 books depending on what subjects you choose.

I also found that with reading find books on things that your child is interested in or else they won't read. With my son he loved tractors so I got lots of books on any type of tractors I could find and go figure today he has his own business which is farming.

My daughter loved anything dealing with the supernatural so that is the types of reading material that I've always purchased for her.

You will also find what works great for one child doesn't always work for another.
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  Old  August 8th, 2007, 1:18am     #104
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Originally Posted by texaslady22
Kathleen, I teach college freshman English and I've had many students who came from homeschools. None of these students have ever been in a remediation course, while about 40% of the (public school) students are.

I think there are good homeschoolers and bad homeschoolers. I don't think you can say that ALL homeschools are better, but let's face it - learning 1 on 1 is much more beneficial to a student than learning at the same pace as everyone else, 27 to 1. There is a give and take with homeschool and with public schools - neither one is completely perfect.

No stats, just my opinion.
I would agree. Some are better then others, but the one on one you can give a child by home schooling is much more beneficial then in a class of 30 kids.

In my opinion I can not see how one on one teaching could not be better then one teacher trying to teach a class of 30 unique kids and maybe a teachers helper if they are lucky.

As far as statistics I have seen them both ways, depending on what side of the argument someone is on, they can make it look good for there cause and to help them make there point. I have been in management for years and I can take a financial statement and make the numbers mean anything I want to get my point across.

And as far as the whole socialization thing, I personally do not think with all the cr@p that goes on in the schools these days that schools is the place I want my son learning his socialization skills. I believe that my son will grow up to be a better person because of being home schooled. I am not saying he will be better then any other child that is in the public school system. I do know that some kids do flourish in the public system, but in my opinion to many kids are pushed through the public school system because teachers don't want to deal with them anymore and they end up graduating without being able to read past a first grade level, don't know simple math, and can't even point out the location of a state on a map, let a lone where different counties are located on the globe.

My son who just turned 7 tested at 7th grade reading level and can tell you every continent and point out it's location on a globe. He can also tell you what countries are on what continents and what bodies of water surround them. He didn't learn this in kindergarten or the first couple months of 1st grade that we had him in school, he learned it from my wife and from reading.

Non of this was crammed down his throat, he learned it because he was interested in cretin things and we supported and bought him books on the things he was interested in. He learned all the different continents and countries because he is into all different types of animals. So when he learned about a animal he learned what continent and country they lived on and where they where located, that was a side benefit to learning about animal, he also learned his geography, and at 7 he knows a lot more then I do about geography.

This is one of the great things about home schooling you can make the curriculum fit each kids individual interest.

JMO
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  Old  August 11th, 2007, 4:39pm     #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texaslady22
I think there are good homeschoolers and bad homeschoolers. I don't think you can say that ALL homeschools are better, but let's face it - learning 1 on 1 is much more beneficial to a student than learning at the same pace as everyone else, 27 to 1. There is a give and take with homeschool and with public schools - neither one is completely perfect.
For me I think homeschooling has many advantages for gradeschool, but I wonder about more advanced coursework. I know that my mom, who was a teacher herself with a masters degree, couldn't help me at all when I was struggling with chemistry of physics concepts in my homework, and she certainly couldn't have taught me to write as well as my english teachers did. I think that once you are at the point that schools bother to have specific teachers for specific subjects, something will be lost with a parent trying to teach it all. I'm sure there are parents out there who can handle more advanced coursework, but I'm sure there are many who really have no business teaching calculus. DH and I both have high IQs and college educations and there are some subjects we would both be at a loss to try to teach to someone else, I can't imagine trying to teach calculus or geometry for instance.
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