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Rapunzel676
August 13th, 2008, 2:52pm
Come one, come all! Anyone who loves those dusty old tomes now has a safe place to freely discuss any aspect of history that happens to strike their fancy. Ancient, modern, Renaissance, Far East -- whatever gets your socks rolling up and down, this is the place for it. Just none of that revisionist BS and Holocaust deniers are absolutely, positively NOT welcome.

Get out your time machines, my friends, and let your inner geek out to play!:chat:

occ1956
August 13th, 2008, 4:14pm
This is a really great subject! I am not sure how many others are fascinated with history, but I am. My Dad passed on his love of this country and the pioneers who came to a foreign shore to settle and make a new life to me. He would drive a hundred miles out of our way to see a historical piece of life that still existed. When we went to the Black Hills, we sat on the dirt floor of a mud house and ate lunch. He wanted us to feel the history as well as read about it. It was such fun.

In the total line of history, our country is very young. My dream is to write a historical novel about my husband's family who came from Ireland and France. I have been researching the settlement of eastern Tennessee in the 1870's. The more I dig, the more I admire how these families lived. His great grandfather times six came to America from Ireland and fought with George Washington before they settled on Long Creek in eastern Tennessee. I am fortunate to have a lot of background, including Patrick McGuire's will. He left half of the kitchen and the orchards, half of the flax to his wife and instructed his 10th son to provide her a home for the rest of her life. Of course, I would have to use fiction to bring this great family to life, but I can just see Catherine in my mind. I am not planning to publish this, but it would be for our grandchildren and their children to save the stories about these pioneers.

Sorry for going on, but I am having a lot of fun trying to bring this family to life.

Jean

"Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me!

Defenderofthefaith
August 13th, 2008, 4:27pm
I love world history myself--love going to the Field Museum of Natural History and all historical museums.

HistoryMystery
August 13th, 2008, 4:36pm
Hooray! A place to call home! :heart:

SweepingBeauty
August 13th, 2008, 6:43pm
I won the History award in high school.:grad:

Hhhyyyddd
August 13th, 2008, 6:57pm
I'm from a whole family of history geeks. My father is a former high school history teacher who took us on a lot of trips to historical sites, particularly in the eastern states. My boyfriend will veer across several lanes of traffic if he spots a historical marker, he can't pass one by. My oldest kid is a history channel addict and pretty well versed in history for a kid of his age.

I live on what used to be George Rogers Clark's farm and enjoy researching about that and other things about my area's very rich history.

Rapunzel676
August 13th, 2008, 11:01pm
Yay, I'm so excited to see I'm not the only history geek around here (though I might have guessed from your name, HM, lol)! Does everyone have any specific eras or historical figures of particular interest to them? As I've mentioned elsewhere (to my great chagrin), I have a degree in history, focusing most of my work on post-medieval Britain (1500-present). I also have an interest in the World Wars, particularly the first, as well as what led up to them. So I guess I'm a little all over the place, though my scope is pretty much limited to Europe. Oddly enough, I never partuclarly got into American history. Maybe it was all those Poli Sci courses, blah! (I almost minored in it! Yikes!)

Jean, that sounds like a wonderful experience! I've heard the Black Hills are really quite beautiful. It's one thing to read about history, quite another to actually live it. If I ever get to go to England, this is exactly the sort of thing I'd like to do. Too bad the Tower of London doesn't allow overnight visits! We don't even have anything around here except Natural History museums. Dinosaurs are all well and good, but I envy those of you who have the real thing in your own back yards!

Best of luck with your novel, Jean. I'm not a huge fan of historicals myself, but the few I've read, I've enjoyed very much. :gvibes:

TooOlduvai
August 14th, 2008, 7:56am
I just finished a class on the Civil War. It was interesting to hear that they attribute the South's loss to a lack of the two-party political party system. It gave me a whole new perspective on what's happening today. I hope to be doing some independent study this fall in historical archaeology - probably focusing on Florida sugar mills. I've also been using the old original 19th century survey maps to locate Seminole Wars forts, and then I map them using GIS. I've got about 12 so far - hope to find a lot more.

HistoryMystery
August 15th, 2008, 6:59pm
I have 3 main areas of interest... They all kind of tie together, though.

My first is presidential history--I love reading biographies of the presidents, collections of stories about the presidents, etc.

My second is assassinated presidents, mainly JFK, although they all have interesting stories.

Lastly, I'm fascinated with funereal history. It started with the assassinated presidents thing, reading about their state funerals, public mourning, etc. Funeral history was the subject of my Master's thesis and it's just such a neat topic. :)

I also like the social aspect of military history--Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, WWII. I'm not terribly interested in military details, but rather the human side of the conflicts.

Really, I love all American history. I'm not as interested in European history, but I firmly believe that a visit there would take care of it. I think many people find history more interesting when they can see it and touch it!

Hhhyyyddd
August 18th, 2008, 2:36pm
Yay, I'm so excited to see I'm not the only history geek around here (though I might have guessed from your name, HM, lol)! Does everyone have any specific eras or historical figures of particular interest to them? As I've mentioned elsewhere (to my great chagrin), I have a degree in history, focusing most of my work on post-medieval Britain (1500-present). I also have an interest in the World Wars, particularly the first, as well as what led up to them. So I guess I'm a little all over the place, though my scope is pretty much limited to Europe. Oddly enough, I never partuclarly got into American history. Maybe it was all those Poli Sci courses, blah! (I almost minored in it! Yikes!)




Oh, gosh, there are so many. I'm one of those people who is always fascinated by pretty much everything....

My first love is British history, from the stone age up through the Tudors- after the Tudors interest lags a bit then starts up again with Victoria. European history in general. Ancient Rome, barbarians, vikings...two people I'm fascinated by are Elanor of Aquitaine and Elizabeth I.

I do like American history, I am fortunate to have been to a lot of historical sites in the Eastern US and that sparks a kid's interest. Also US history (if you stay away from pre-Columbian) is short and sweet compared to the old world so it's easier to get a grip on. I prefer the "highlights" as far as US history, the Revolution, the Civil War, the westward expansion. I like to geek out on local history- Louisville, KY and the surrounding area has a far more interesting history than you might guess.

I've always preferred antiquity but lately find myself more interested in the 20th century. Now that it's said and done it's interesting to look back on all the changes.

If there's any such thing as history of cinema, I'm into it, if not, maybe I should invent it. I love learning about the early days of the film industry and the technology involved.

occ1956
August 18th, 2008, 3:38pm
I understand how you feel about American history. I enjoy learning about all World history, but with our American history you can at least find some hands on experiences. I think my Dad influenced me so much about our early history, On one trip we stood by the Independence Rock in Wyoming. I walked in the tracks that still existed from the wagon trains and saw the carved signatures left by the settlers on their way to their new home. Independence Rock stands high out of the praire where two wagon train trails met, one going to Oregon and the other to southern settlements. We were all alone that day under a blue sky and I felt the vibes all around me about these pioneers. It was a magical memory. My Dad left me with so many memories of our American history from our Eastern coast to the Western shores.



This last summer I finally got to see St. Augustine, FL. I read so much about the days when St. Augustine was settled and particularly events around the Oldest house. It was a real treat and I truly felt as if I had stepped back in time. I also like to scrapbook our trips and found a treasure trove of photos everywhere I looked. One of the early settlers who lived in the Oldest house, Maria Fenwick, had particularly lived a colorful life. I bought a copy of her will and it gave a window of her personality and how they settled estates in early Florida. Everything from the smallest item in her property was listed, including whether they were very worn to large pieces of furniture. Her slaves were listed by names and how much she appreciated them. Finding that she left a worn white lace petticoat brought her to life for me. I can't imagine how they would list our property these days.

If we look around us, we can learn much from our ancestors and pioneers who left pieces of themselves that made us who we are today. Anyone who feels history is boring just haven't
looked beyond the history books.

Jean

"Let there be peace on earth and let it begin with me!"

TooOlduvai
August 18th, 2008, 4:01pm
For anyone interested in pre-columbian western hemisphere - read 1491. It was incredible.

Rapunzel676
September 2nd, 2008, 8:15pm
Anyone else not a fan of revisionist history (e.g., the Civil War wasn't fought over the issue of slavery)? :rolleyes:

TooOlduvai
September 2nd, 2008, 8:46pm
Anyone else not a fan of revisionist history (e.g., the Civil War wasn't fought over the issue of slavery)? :rolleyes:

I'm not crazy about it either. All the talk I'm hearing these days about "states rights" is disconcerting. There are some really great books out there about the Civil War - and Ken Burn's video was absolutely wonderful. But no - Lincoln would have been just as glad to have continued slavery in order to end the war, as not. It would eventually have been replaced with a different system, many many lives would have been saved, and the resentment against blacks would have been a footnote rather than several chapters in this country's history.

Rapunzel676
September 2nd, 2008, 8:53pm
I'm not crazy about it either. All the talk I'm hearing these days about "states rights" is disconcerting. There are some really great books out there about the Civil War - and Ken Burn's video was absolutely wonderful. But no - Lincoln would have been just as glad to have continued slavery in order to end the war, as not. It would eventually have been replaced with a different system, many many lives would have been saved, and the resentment against blacks would have been a footnote rather than several chapters in this country's history.

And Richard III had nothing to do with the disappearance of the Princes in the Tower. Jack the Ripper was a member of the royal family. The moon landing was faked. :worry:

Bunk. Pure bunk. I guess people will believe what they want to believe in spite of all evidence to the contrary. It's easier than thinking.

TooOlduvai
September 2nd, 2008, 9:28pm
And Richard III had nothing to do with the disappearance of the Princes in the Tower. Jack the Ripper was a member of the royal family. The moon landing was faked. :worry:

Bunk. Pure bunk. I guess people will believe what they want to believe in spite of all evidence to the contrary. It's easier than thinking.

I think some people don't know the difference between fact and fiction.

HistoryMystery
September 3rd, 2008, 6:42pm
I don't mind different views being presented--I do think that the Civil War was infinitely more complex than just slavery. I think many other contributing factors (states' rights, economic issues, etc.) can be traced back to slavery issues, but there was a lot more going on! So I don't mind people taking a different approach--but I wish more people would just see all of these history books as a collaborative approach to history rather than one is right, one is wrong, etc.