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aycorn
February 20th, 2007, 11:46pm
How do you guys feel about BMI report cards?? ... these are "report cards" that have your kids weight and body mass index on it.. indicating if your kid is obese/overweight .. and these are for kids under 10


i think it just opens up kids to a whole set of pressures and will lead to more eating disorders.. why does a 5-10 yr old kid need to know their BMI?? thats the parents responsibility to make sure their kids eat right..

are schools taking this a bit too far? is it a school's responsibility to monitor your child's weight

Captain Nemo
February 20th, 2007, 11:52pm
sorry to say i think it's gonna get worse. :frown3:

Jodimae
February 20th, 2007, 11:53pm
In my opinion we are becomming less free... this is America.. I had MY child..Don't tell me what to do with MY child.
Abuse etc. is one thing, but schools telling me my child is over weight NOT THEIR BUSINESS!! :mad2:
Health care providers requiring me to give my 11 year old a PPV shot.. NO :frown3:
I think people are going too far with certain things...
What ever happened to "the good ol' days?" :boring:

CHRISSY61121
February 20th, 2007, 11:56pm
I don't think it is right. They should not bug kids about it. Its like you said. My cousins neice is 6 and all she talks about is fat people, and how much she thinks you should eat. What is wrong with this world? I really hate hearing her talk about it. I am not thin. It ticks me off. 6 Years old. She eats like a bird and she is tiny compared to the rest of kids her age.

tupik3702
February 20th, 2007, 11:57pm
when people cost the system money, it'll find a way to correct that problem. Why should you have to pay for others self abuse. Accountability and responsibility are key words here. Should we protect ourselves from ourselves??? :sherlock:

curlyvan
February 20th, 2007, 11:59pm
If they do that, it won't change anything. If you have a child that is overweight, you already know it. I don't get the point of a BMI report card.

rdhill007
February 21st, 2007, 12:07am
I think that they are a bunch of crock. My niece is technically overweight for a 3 year old but she is eating healthy and is extremely active.

BEARHUGS65
February 21st, 2007, 12:07am
several years ago...like 4 yrs ago our state sent a letter with the bmi from the state saying your child is obese- well. at the time he was 6'1 and 260 pure muscle- showed it to the doc and she called thelocal news- mad as hell- and tghe school....you see he had like 18% body fat not even that and the charts do not account for that- think of how many poor girls are going to be barfing- ok bulimia and other things becasue of these stupid things- they are finally stopping them after many people said they had enough- you know if your kid is fat- its not the schools job to police

Ravin
February 21st, 2007, 12:08am
If they do that, it won't change anything. If you have a child that is overweight, you already know it. I don't get the point of a BMI report card.


Me either! I mean really, a child knows they have a problem and having more pressure by the embarrassment of a school now telling them? Not even including the fact there are kids out there be abused everyday and they are more worried about kids weight?

But, hey lets make the kids feel worse about themselves, embarrass them. And poor money into BS that shouldn't be any of their concern.

I have a niece that's overweight, I think due to her parents she has became a emotional eater at a very young age. Plus, he dad is a total idiot and blames everyone and her about her weight. But, never cooks a meal and eats out and brings them McDonalds nuggets and cheese burgers home at least 3 times a week. But, does nothing like keeping fruit on hand or heaven forbid changing his own eating habits so she learns to eat more nutritional meals.

Kelly82
February 21st, 2007, 12:18am
I personally think that the weight of each child is none of the school's business. Why write to parents and make them and their child upset? They know if they have a problem with their weight or not. I think the school should just butt out. We don't need kids being weight obsessed any earlier than they already are. :worry:

I babysat for a 9 year old girl and she said, "I need to lose some weight soon, I weigh the most in my class" She's quite thin and taller than most of the girls in her class. Made me sad for the girls of today. I don't remember thinking much about what I weighed until 7th or 8th grade.
I can't imagine being 8 or 9 years old and thinking about dieting. geez. :worry:

rocksea_lady
February 21st, 2007, 12:20am
I don't think it is a good thing to talk about with the child. I come from an Italian family that thinks fat is cute and honestly don't understand that it's not baby fat at 8. It's unhealthy and I think that some parents need to be educated. I think that perhaps the family physician (if they had time which I doubt they do nowadays) or the school counselor should talk to the parents. I think giving children classes on nutrition, not serving garbage in the lunch room & snack/soda machine, and keeping PE a part of their school day is extremely important. The last thing a kid needs is another reason to be picked on

IMHO

WeenyMomma
February 21st, 2007, 12:30am
I think it's crappy. I'm almost 30 and I can remember them doing that testing on us when I was in grade school. At the time I wasn't what I'd call fat and they made me feel awful. I don't remember them sending anything home to parents, but I could be wrong. I will never forget the way it made me feel though. I've always been a bigger girl, everyone knows it, no need to have it pointed out it's obvious. Kids are cruel to each other anyway, and when they did this to us we were all pretty much in front of each other. My step daughter is grown, but if I had kids in the school system now I'd tell them to leave my child out of it. Kids don't need this. From a pleasantly plump chick, it just gave me another reason to feel bad about myself.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 12:31am
I think this is BS and if my 9 year old son brings something home I am going to raise hell. He already knows he is overweight, he has been told he is fat and it ticks me off so bad. We are trying!!! If we could get him to stay out of the food, if we could get him to eat all of his veggies and stuff, if we could keep him more active (bought them a trampoline and jump ropes, etc.) then he will start losing more, the weather doesn't help right now. He will also be having a growth spurt anytime. I don't need or want people telling my son he is fat! He is already starting to talk about wanting to diet, etc. I love him more than anything and just because he is overweight doesn't make him a different person. Yes, he needs to be healthy but, let ME deal with that. I have already started cooking different foods, giving them more water, etc.

As for my 5 year old DD, do you know what she told me recently? Mommy, I don't want to eat that, I don't want to get fat. WTF??! Who is putting this crap in my kids heads? She is 5 years old!

I can see it now, more and more kids are going to start having eating disorders and more depression at an early age. :mad2: :worry: :frown3:

Oh, and before anyone here decides they want to judge or bash me because my child is overweight, DON'T. I don't want to hear it and it's no one's place to judge me. I say this because, I have seen so many negative bashing posts lately.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 12:33am
I wanted to add that I am obsessed with my weight so I know what these overweight kids are going through and feel. Being a public display is just wrong. (BMI checks by schools)

kaaas
February 21st, 2007, 12:37am
I think its ridiculous.

My favorite part is that they cut the PE classes (and art) and then say the kids are lazy and myopic.

Now were grading our children on their appearance... ridiculous. :worry:

gcomstock
February 21st, 2007, 12:44am
When, after ten years of borderline hypertension, I had a Kaiser doctor finally care enough to confront me and emphasize (I'm 55) that I need to start taking BP medicine and seriously need to take all the other widely understood steps (reduce caloric intake, sodium consumption, and weight), my first impulse was to dislike him. He's fat himself, after all. Ten minutes later I was over it, and appreciated a corporate doc who finally stepped up.

We've been over this topic several times now, and many of you are wrapping yourselves in some kind of libertarian / patriotic / spirit of personal freedom flag in the discussion. Hey, have YOU called Jenny yet?

If your kid gets a bad BMI score...who are you going to call? You want to debate the effect of...the TRUTH...on your beloved overweight kids? Shoot the messenger? Yap about a slippery slope, how our benign ignorance is denied a foothold? Come on people. Visit Japan and the public toilets will read your beads for you. Go ahead and piddle into the wind, it's refreshing!

There must be a public school system that will still let Johnny buy cokes and become as obese as home cooking allows. If not, there's always home schooling. My doctor gave me a mitzvah, and your kids are getting one too, imho.

Schools didn't just grasp this idea (of BMI scores) like a straw in the wind. Don't you think there is sound research behind it...a clear pattern of students growing fatter and fatter each year, porky 12 year olds with BP higher than mine?

Cigarettes, booze, drugs...if schools were to advise parents of children using those substances...it would be all cool, because they are nominally illegal whereas being fat is legal? I've already heard these arguments, and there's a hole in that crock.

I'm sick of this huge "enabling" backlash of fat people trying to feel good about themselves...by obscuring the medical facts, and perpetrating this self-esteem hoax. Being fat doesn't mean we're not sexy, or smart and fun and worthy. But we're still fat, and that's seriously unhealthy.

Kathleenob
February 21st, 2007, 1:01am
I think its ridiculous.

My favorite part is that they cut the PE classes (and art) and then say the kids are lazy and myopic.

Now were grading our children on their appearance... ridiculous. :worry:

Exactly. My kids have PE for 20 minutes 2x a week. It is complete crap. They have also eliminated all team sports from the Jr. Highs. Why? So we can keep up with the testing schedules. No child left behind, my a**. We had PE every day in elementary, and teams in Jr. High. We had drama and art and music and choir- that is all done on a visiting basis now. Some volunteer from the district comes in once a month and tells the kids about Van Gogh.

Their punishment for infractions is to stay in for recesses- smart. Don't let them run off the extra energy- make them sit on the wall. And has anyone tried those crap school lunches? My kids refuse to eat them. School lunches were tasty when I was in school. Man, what I wouldn't give for a Pittsburger right about now. And a nice game of hopscotch or Chinese jump rope.

devnzac
February 21st, 2007, 1:15am
There are probably many people who don't realize how overweight their children are. I am more than happy to look at a piece of paper that says my child is of normal/low/high BMI. What I choose to do with it is my option. They are not telling you to put your child on a diet they are telling you that your child is at risk for things that accompany having a high BMI. It is easier to train a child into good eating habits than to let them figure it out on their own as an adult.

I think kids should be aware of good & bad eating habits. They should be aware of their weight. They should be aware that they don't want to be fat & they should be concerned with it. Why not... we want them to stay away from drugs & drinking to protect their health. Realize that food can be a drug for some and that it needs just as much attention as the others. You cannot live without food so it is even more important to teach your children proper eating habits.

My kids are both in the normal BMI range. They are very active. I do not withold any foods. They are allowed to have candy & desserts and soda. They just don't have them often. They eat correct portions (you would be amazed what true portions are). They rarely eat until they are "full". They only eat until they are no longer hungry. If your child is trained to eat until they are "full" they are being trained to overeat.

Many may disagree with me but that is ok. I have no problem with any information sent from the schools that will help me to protect my childs future.

Judy Jetson
February 21st, 2007, 1:17am
I do think that if a child is obese then it's a serious problem. However, I think the schools need to look within before they start pointing fingers. The school lunches are unhealthy. Hamburgers, pizza, sloppy joes, on and on, day after day. My son takes his lunch to school because of this. The schools will argue that they offer healthy alternatives. That doesn't work at home, why would it work at school. If you have junk food at home and healthy snacks, most kids will take the junk food. Same thing at school, they are kids, what do you expect. So let's see a report card on the school menu first.

nvtribefan
February 21st, 2007, 1:34am
If your kid gets a bad BMI score...who are you going to call? You want to debate the effect of...the TRUTH...on your beloved overweight kids? Shoot the messenger?

But we're still fat, and that's seriously unhealthy.


The voice of reason.

It is a service, and a good one. Some people may truly not realize their kids are unfit, and some would happily live in denial.

I feel sorry for the many children I see who are obese. They need their parents' help, not their excuses.

Jessibear19
February 21st, 2007, 2:03am
I think the school system's heart is in the right place, but many times it falls on deaf ears. Children who are obese often have parents who are obese, and if a parent can't take responsibility for their own health, how are they supposed to help their child? In a society where over 60% of adults are overweight, this is a huge cultural problem and the cycle is very hard to break. That we are seeing obese children at earlier ages than ever before is just a symptom of a much larger health epidemic we as Americans are facing, and one that is only going to get worse.

I think there are many factors that contribute to poor diets and a sedentary lifestyle-parks and woods where people used to go to walk or hike have either been bulldozed into strip malls or are terribly unsafe. With both parents having to work just to make ends meet, often times they both are exhausted and stressed out at the end of the day and the convenience of processed foods becomes very alluring. Video games and computers are certainly here to stay. I think there's little that schools could do even if they wanted to, families have to want to work towards living healthy lifestyles.

I would love to see a school nutritionist in the same line as a school psychlogist or school nurse who offers help to parents and children free of charge if they would like it. They could help them plan menus that everyone would enjoy, arrange family activities (maybe even involve other parents and their children, get to know one another, I can see a lot of good coming from stepping outside of one's comfort zone), and just act as a sort of mentor for enacting healthy changes for families who could use some help.

Janir
February 21st, 2007, 3:22am
I kinda think it's BS also, the entire weight thing! I entered a contest yesterday that asked for my height , weight & what my goal was (it was to lose weight) I honestly answered my height & weight & was presented with a screen that said "Congratulations! You are right on with your BMI your weight is perfect for your height." Um, NO, it's not! I just told you I was fat!

And I hear ya, Kathleen, when I was a kid we had PE every day! We ran the track & did jumping jacks, etc. DD only had PE once a week in middle school, none in HS. :worry:

gemini lion
February 21st, 2007, 3:49am
My son was a bit chunky through adolesence. Kids go through phases and we as parents know when our kids may be overweight and can handle it ourselves. He outgrew the pudginess and is now pretty slender.

With the B.M.I. report card they are trying to say we are stupid and don't know how to feed our kids. Not only that, I don't think it's emotionally healthy to give a young kid (especially a girl who is feeling all kinds of pressure from the media, etc. into thinking that if she isnt' stick thin she is worth nothing) a report card telling them that they are fat.

What's the point???? Let the child's doctor handle it if he/she thinks they are obese.

CheckedOut
February 21st, 2007, 4:56am
If kids make it to that stage of clinical OBESITY (not baby fat, not chunkiness, not love handles), I think the parents have lost their right to have a say in the matter. At that point they have proven their incapability/incompetence/indifference to the matter. Furthermore, it is SO selfish (dare I say abuse/neglect) for a parent to say it's MY kid so I'm gonna raise him how I want to (sure, if you are raising the kid PROPERLY, it works but what if you aren't?).

Having said that, BMI report cards that go to the parents - the very people making the kids fat is not going to solve anything. Personal responsibility as a governing law only works if people actually ARE responsible. And if they are fat, and their kids are fat, they clearly aren't getting the job done, so someone else has to at least try, right?

teechbiz
February 21st, 2007, 5:20am
I CRINGED when I saw that article originally and posted a similar thread a few months back.

I can't imagine as a teacher confronting a parent and saying "Hello mrs whatever, your child bobo is HUGE. now look you need to stop feeding him ding dongs and twinkies OK. BTW I'm documenting this call so I expect to see some progress."

Obviously the call would never go out but look that's what I feel like we are doing when we do that. Teachers and school systems don't come up with these things. Oh believe me we are concerned, as are some parents that it's probably not too healthy for a 14 year old girl who's 5 foot 2 to weigh 300 pounds but most of us feel that the parent its the one who needs to monitor the situation.

So where does this come from? Well gasp, and I hate to be too political here but there are politicials who believe that the government should be the nanny state. I just saw on the news a nice, caring, concerned Democrat wants a bill to make washing hands after going to the bathroom a law for children. What parent hasn't told their kid hey wash those hands soap and water. Who monitors this behavior at school the teacher? Do they hire a handwashing monitor? What happens to the lawbreakers, jail time?

I understand where she was coming from. She was on tv caring, concerned talking about diseases and how they spread and the importance of handwashing. Hey you don't have to convince me. I'm in you should wash your hands. Your kids should wash their hands. The roadblock in my mind is that she wants to actually pass a law requiring it. The nanny state strikes again. It was the same thing with the weight issue. I understood what they were trying to accomplish but I just argue with the way the pronanny state legislators are going about this. Wouldn't it be better if kids learn about nutrition and healthy eating at school and let the parents reinforce it rather than the school? Are schools and teachers always the best judge?

I am a teacher. I am a parent but only to my two boys and they are grown. I don't need or want to parent other people's kids. I am not a nanny. I don't want a nanny state. Well that's the end of my quasi political rant.

teechbiz
February 21st, 2007, 5:44am
I CRINGED when I saw that article originally and posted a similar thread a few months back.

I can't imagine as a teacher confronting a parent and saying "Hello mrs whatever, your child bobo is HUGE. now look you need to stop feeding him ding dongs and twinkies OK. BTW I'm documenting this call so I expect to see some progress."

Obviously the call would never go out but look that's what I feel like we are doing when we do that. Teachers and school systems don't come up with these things. Oh believe me we are concerned, as are some parents that it's probably not too healthy for a 14 year old girl who's 5 foot 2 to weigh 300 pounds but most of us feel that the parent its the one who needs to monitor the situation.

So where does this come from? Well gasp, and I hate to be too political here but there are politicians who believe that the government should be the nanny state. I just saw on the news a nice, caring, concerned Democrat wants a bill to make washing hands after going to the bathroom a law for children. What parent hasn't told their kid hey wash those hands soap and water. Who monitors this behavior at school the teacher? Do they hire a handwashing monitor? What happens to the lawbreakers, jail time?

I understand where she was coming from. She was on tv caring, concerned talking about diseases and how they spread and the importance of handwashing. Hey you don't have to convince me. I'm in you should wash your hands. Your kids should wash their hands. The roadblock in my mind is that she wants to actually pass a law requiring it. The nanny state strikes again. It was the same thing with the weight issue. I understood what they were trying to accomplish but I just argue with the way the pronanny state legislators are going about this. Wouldn't it be better if kids learn about nutrition and healthy eating at school and let the parents reinforce it rather than the school? Are schools and teachers always the best judge?

I am a teacher. I am a parent but only to my two boys and they are grown. I don't need or want to parent other people's kids. I am not a nanny. I don't want a nanny state. Well that's the end of my quasi political rant.

kmesh
February 21st, 2007, 6:00am
The voice of reason.

It is a service, and a good one. Some people may truly not realize their kids are unfit, and some would happily live in denial.

I feel sorry for the many children I see who are obese. They need their parents' help, not their excuses.

For third grade boys (and our daughter). We were truly amazed at how lazy these kids are. Many of them are slightly over weight and were winded with one run up and down the court! This was all of the kids with the exception of our daughter and 2 other boys!

I'm not saying that it's right, there are other ways to bring the parents attention to it I'm sure. On the other hand, many of the parents would probably say "oh, that's not my kid" unless they got a note sent home to prove it.

I don't think the school did it to say "hey, your kid is fat- lose some weight". I think that they are trying to help pursue a healthier lifestyle. Far too many kids are sitting on their butts eating doritoes, drinking pepsi and playing video games-plain and simple!

grimmouse
February 21st, 2007, 6:24am
I think it's a good idea...if a parent is not willing to help their children be as heathy as they can be...then shame on them. Healthy eating and excercise habits start in the home, and yes, there may be some genetics involved that cause some children to become obese...but not that many people in the USA have that disposition... give me a break most of the blame is to be put on the parents and their lifestyle. Hold yourself accountable for your fat children, stop being defensive; get off the couch and do something about. JMO

hawkshoe
February 21st, 2007, 6:41am
When I first heard about this, I thought it was nuts. However, with further thinking, it really isn't any different than years ago when they used to put your kids height and weight on the report cards. Honestly, I don't really think it is the schools place, it should be left to the childs pediatrician and parents. With the growing number of obese kids, it appears that using the schools is a way to get the message out the masses. I do agree with the poster that said that the schools are part of the problem. The school lunches are not very healthy (our school has made some effort to change this, switching to whole wheat bread and such) and many schools are cutting PE classes. Still the real problem begins even before a child enters school. This is why the childs Dr. and parents need to be on top of things.

On a side note, my son got his first BMI letter last year. His BMI was below what is should be. What to do then? I just laughed because I know he is healthy and so does his Dr.

rikergirl
February 21st, 2007, 6:44am
i totally agree this is crap. the nurses dont choose to do this. it is mandated like vision and scoliosis screening. we do as we are told.

i am happy to say in my county we are still doing the height and weight but no letters will be sent out this year. (we dont work for the schools. we work for the county)

obesity is a really bad problem that is leading to high blood pressure, diabetes and other adult diseases, personally seen by me in my middle school children.

just something to think about.

JH33194
February 21st, 2007, 6:44am
That is so wrong! Most schools are having financial problems and for them to waste money on something that doesn't even need to be done is just stupid!
I think one of the issues with kids and worrying about their weight is all the garbage on tv these days. Last year, my then 8 yr old DD put on her bathing suit to go swimming in a hotel pool...she looks in the mirror and says "mom, does this make my butt look big?" I couldn't believe she said that! I KNOW she didn't get it from me, I don't say things like that because I already know the answer :laugh: . She is now 9 years old, about 60 lbs and in no way fat. If I buy her size 8 pants, she needs a belt with them, the only reason for the 8's is the height. Last night we were laying on the couch and she pulls up some excess skin from her stomach (because of the way she was laying...not that she has lots of excess skin...lol) and says "look at all this fat"...UGH! I explained to her she is in no way fat. It doesn't help that she has a 12 yr old brother that thinks it's his job to pick on her.
Now my 12 yr old is overweight...he's very self conscious and won't even go swimming without a shirt on. The thing is, he is what is considered normal weight for his height...just not for his age. As much as he grows, I know it will catch up with him, he will outgrow it.
I cook meals EVERY day (I love to cook), and they eat decent, although he thinks there's something wrong with most fruits and veggies... :rolleyes:
Anyway, I do not think kids need to be told when they are under or over weight, it is very obvious...the schools need to save their money.

figgyfigg
February 21st, 2007, 6:48am
I don't think it's right for schools or anyone but the parent to regulate a childs weight. That being said, I'm amazed at the amount of fat and sugar that parents allow children to have these days, it's really not surprising that rate of obese children is up. No, the children shouldn't be made to feel bad about it, but the parents should. I'm not talking about children that eat normally and healthy and are carrying a little bit of pudgy weight, I'm talking about the kids who are never told to drink water and think snack time is whenever they feel and dinner is McDonalds.

feefee
February 21st, 2007, 7:05am
It makes me angry. Like the kids and parents don't know if the child is overweight? It almost seems to say that appearance is as important as education, which is ridiculous.

Here's a thought - how about making school lunches more nutritious, how about more than a 15 minute recess in the morning and 15 minutes at lunch for the kids to burn up some calories. That might help with all of the children they label as ADD/ADHD as well. How about some classes on nutrition at an earlier age? How about more than two 40 minute PE periods a week? How about funding more afterschool programs that encourage physical fitness?

Their job is to educate and grade on things they teach, not grade a child on their appearance or make a parent feel that while their child might be in the Talented and Gifted program, that is not good enough and clearly the parents must not care about their child if the child is chubby.


It's early, Thank God, or I could rant about this for hours.

ktwdg
February 21st, 2007, 7:10am
My kid is too fat. He's tromping on the treadmill with me when he doesn't have p.e. He is 17.


The report card is fine with me. If you had actually heard some of the things that parents say, you might think they need a leg up. I do believe that parents should have all the rights, but some of them couldn't find their way out of a wet paper bag with a map, guide, flashlight, and a pair of scissors. I feel badly for their kids, but they are THEIR kids.

Scully77
February 21st, 2007, 7:17am
Children have enough pressure at school to worry about whether the school thinks that they are fat. I am astonished that schools have enough time to worry about weight. Most people don't realize that the United States educational system lacks dramatically compared to other nations. I think they should have a report card to remind them of there true intent..EDUCATION.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 7:50am
If kids make it to that stage of clinical OBESITY (not baby fat, not chunkiness, not love handles), I think the parents have lost their right to have a say in the matter. At that point they have proven their incapability/incompetence/indifference to the matter. Furthermore, it is SO selfish (dare I say abuse/neglect) for a parent to say it's MY kid so I'm gonna raise him how I want to (sure, if you are raising the kid PROPERLY, it works but what if you aren't?).

Having said that, BMI report cards that go to the parents - the very people making the kids fat is not going to solve anything. Personal responsibility as a governing law only works if people actually ARE responsible. And if they are fat, and their kids are fat, they clearly aren't getting the job done, so someone else has to at least try, right?
Whatever.... :worry:

tfacey
February 21st, 2007, 8:04am
The same parents who are angry to receive a BMI score for their child in the mail from the school will be the same parents to sue the school when their child accidentally gets hurt during PE class. We have put them in a damned if you do, damned if you don't situation.

Come on people, childhood obesity is an ALL TIME EPIDEMIC in this country. How are we to address this on a mass scale without spreading the word to the people who have the most influence over the children?? You, the parents.

While you may be angry about it... it may very well save some children suffering from serious long term illness and the effects of obesity when it causes another parent to jump into action. It may very well save the lives of these children. It may very well save the lives of those parents too.

On a daily basis, I help families who are trying to catch a run away cart when it comes to dealing with the obesity in their children. For some, it is too late in the game for their kids, because they are so set in their ways, it becomes a losing battle. That to me is so sad.

So, I vote yes on the BMI letters.

Inkyskeeper
February 21st, 2007, 8:07am
well i think that if the parent asks for help knowing they cant help themselfs or their child then it be okay for school to help.
Other then that i too think its wrong for schools to go this far.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 8:08am
The same parents who are angry to receive a BMI score for their child in the mail from the school will be the same parents to sue the school when their child accidentally gets hurt during PE class. We have put them in a damned if you do, damned if you don't situation.
.

I would appreciate it if people would stop putting others in the same catagory. Don't assume, you don't know me. I wish my child would have PE daily but, they don't. It was cut down to maybe once per week. If my child got hurt in PE, I wouldn't sue if they at least did everything to ensure safety for the children.

rbuske
February 21st, 2007, 8:11am
I think public schools are about one thing...conformity. They are about indoctrating (SP?). They are about teaching kids to conform to whatever the US thinks is the appropriate behaviors, morals, ect. Read recently (don't remember the site), that many think the reason the education in the USA is behind some countries is because of this emphasis, rather than education. This is just another way. Not that i don't think we are getting too fat as a nation, but school should be about education.
Not trying to start a debate, JMO
Wish I could have afforded a private school for my son.

tfacey
February 21st, 2007, 8:14am
I would appreciate it if people would stop putting others in the same catagory. Don't assume, you don't know me. I wish my child would have PE daily but, they don't. It was cut down to maybe once per week. If my child got hurt in PE, I wouldn't sue if they at least did everything to ensure safety for the children.

Miki - you need to stop taking these responses so personally. If you feeled "grouped" into that category, I didn't put you there.

daydreamer2
February 21st, 2007, 8:16am
It's horrible. I have a almost 13 year old girl whom is obsessed with her weight. I have to sit with her during her meals to make sure she eats it all. I hope this changes, I can't imagine when she is older.

rbuske
February 21st, 2007, 8:22am
If kids make it to that stage of clinical OBESITY (not baby fat, not chunkiness, not love handles), I think the parents have lost their right to have a say in the matter. At that point they have proven their incapability/incompetence/indifference to the matter. Furthermore, it is SO selfish (dare I say abuse/neglect) for a parent to say it's MY kid so I'm gonna raise him how I want to (sure, if you are raising the kid PROPERLY, it works but what if you aren't?).

Having said that, BMI report cards that go to the parents - the very people making the kids fat is not going to solve anything. Personal responsibility as a governing law only works if people actually ARE responsible. And if they are fat, and their kids are fat, they clearly aren't getting the job done, so someone else has to at least try, right?

I agree, that as a nation we are getting too fat. i am fat. however, where does it stop? if you say the parents are to blame, does that give the state, the feds, the government the right to step in in ANY situation because Anything that isn't what they think is normal or conforms to the AVERAGE must be wrong and therefore the parents fault, so they have the right to get involved? Schools are supposed to be about educatiing our children.This is a subject that should be taught in health class or similar class. Once they start these reports, which may seem harmless on the surface now, what will that grow into in 5 years or 10? I shudder to think of the possibilities.

lassss
February 21st, 2007, 8:25am
I was the one who posted about this a month or two ago. It was a real eye opener. We knew that our 17 yr old was getting heavier and we mentioned it to her but like every kid, they just roll their eyes and say whatever and continue eating chips and candy. When the school sent a letter, she cried and cried but she realized that now she does have to do something about the extra weight as it is not flattering. We did throw out all the junk food and concentrated on us as a family to eat better and not single her out.

So in retrospect..yes I think it is a good idea if the school sends a letter home informing the parents that their child COULD possible become obese and that the childs/family lifestyle should be looked at

tfacey
February 21st, 2007, 8:27am
Your child can have PE daily right in your own home. How?

All I can tell you is what I did for my kids... shut off the TV... shut off the computers.... shut off the playstations. On school nights, they got an hour a night on any one of those, their pick. During the weekend, it was two hours a day.

And get this... in February and September (back to school months). We turned ALL those things off for the entire month. Yes, you heard me... the ENTIRE month. Now that my kids are grown, they look back on those months very fondly.

The rest of the time they played. Just like we used to do. And they did chores. Sweeping, vacuuming, laundry... Too snowy to play outside... not too snowy to have them shoveling! We had family wrestling night... we all got on the trampoline... we all got on the bikes.

While it would be ideal for the schools to have more PE for the kids... its not going to happen. So as parents, we have to create a more active environment.

redfantum
February 21st, 2007, 8:28am
I don't mind the schools notifying parents, but I DO mind if they tell the students. I have an 11 year old girl who is not overweight, but after Christmas she tells me that she wants to go on a diet. Why??? Because she does not have a stick straight little boy figure like most of the other girls. She was born with hips. They are not going to go away. The last thing young girls need is to become obsessed with weight at an impressionable age, leading to eating disorders.

Yes, parents should know when there is a potential problem so that they can deal with it, NOT the children.

bran_dp
February 21st, 2007, 8:28am
I don't think it is a good thing to talk about with the child. I come from an Italian family that thinks fat is cute and honestly don't understand that it's not baby fat at 8. It's unhealthy and I think that some parents need to be educated. I think that perhaps the family physician (if they had time which I doubt they do nowadays) or the school counselor should talk to the parents. I think giving children classes on nutrition, not serving garbage in the lunch room & snack/soda machine, and keeping PE a part of their school day is extremely important. The last thing a kid needs is another reason to be picked on

IMHO

Could they not instead offer free nutrition/cooking/healthy eating classes to parents and children? I feel that would be MUCH more productive. If the school system is going to take it upon themselves to point out nutrition should they not also educate parents about proper nutrition?

smileysal
February 21st, 2007, 8:31am
I have mixed feelings on this subject. I do agree schools need to make the lunches healthy, take out the vending machines with junk and soda and subsitute it with health alternatives. P.E and sports programs should be incourage and not taken away. When children bring treats to school, they should only allow health snacks. To send home notes to let you know your child is overweight, that I think is a little to much. Most health care providers will let you know if your child is or isn't. I just took my youngest in for his 5 year old check up. The doctor did comfront me about his weight. Shocked I was not. Yes, he is a little chunky and gained weight over the winter, so I expected it. I am not worried. In the summer he will be outside playing and hopefully loose a little of it. Now, ds keeps asking me if he is fat. He will hold his stomache in and say look "I am skinny". For the next few days after this appointment he would ask me "Will this make me fat" during dinner. It breaks my heart to see him concerned about his appearance and he isn't even five yet.

newkidney22602
February 21st, 2007, 8:34am
This is such a touchy subject. I was an overweight child and was mortified when we had to get on the scale every year in gym class in front of everybody. This has been going on forever, they just never got the parents involved in it before. I think it is good to make the parent aware. My parents were blinded by love, and didn't notice the extra pounds I had put on after my their divorce. I think if they could have gotten some sort of report or information from the school, it may have helped. Some times you just need info to make a change. Even though you don't get a report now, doesn't mean they are not being weighed. Like I said most schools weigh a child every year in gym class. I would rather the school send a letter to my home instead of announcing it in front of everyone. It would have made my life so much easier.

This is just my opinion.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 8:41am
Miki - you need to stop taking these responses so personally. If you feeled "grouped" into that category, I didn't put you there.

Thank you for clarifying that. I know that sometimes I take things really personally, sometimes the way the posts are worded, I have a hard time with whether it is towards people as a whole group or whatever.

When it comes to a child being overweight, I am there and trying to deal with it. My son is already upset about it but, he just won't stop eating. They don't offer PE but, maybe once per week. I bought my kids a huge trampoline with income tax money a couple weeks ago and jump ropes this week. I have tons of veggies in the house to make with every meal, I bought fruit ect. for them. I don't know what else to do besides everything I am already doing except for putting locks on the fridge or cupboards. Then he throws himself down and tosses a fit screaming how he is starving. We hardly give in but, I can bet the neighbors down the way are wondering what is going on.

I send daily snacks to school since it was requested by the school. I send a juice and I try to send something healthy. It's not always possible though. I ask my son everyday what he ate for school. Do you know that for awhile he would tell me he ate a chef salad? Know why? He said to lose weight! :cry:

If the weather would improve I could get them outside more but, it's too cold and rainy. If it is sunny or at least warm enough to play I have them wait on doing homework so that they could go out and get exercise. My kids told me that they don't get to go outside very often at school.

I am trying so hard to help him with his weight and mine as well. I don't need him being put in front of everyone or being told how fat he is by school officials, I don't need him even more depressed. I know how overweight he is, it worries the heck out of me, he knows how overweight he is so why keep pointing it out? His self esteem doesn't need to be lowered by other adults, the kids lower it enough as it is.

For the record, I take responsibility, I do blame myself. It's my fault he got that way, whose fault can I put the blame on? He lives with my dh and I, no one else. The schools can help by putting PE back out there for the kids and giving healthier lunches. They already banned soda machines and snack machines. That is a start.

tfacey
February 21st, 2007, 8:43am
Could they not instead offer free nutrition/cooking/healthy eating classes to parents and children? I feel that would be MUCH more productive. If the school system is going to take it upon themselves to point out nutrition should they not also educate parents about proper nutrition?

Sorry, the schools should NOT be teaching the parents any of this... as it is, they have been getting it all wrong for a long time. Lets not forget they were teaching a government issued food pyramid that they just recently re-designed because it was all wrong.

There is enough basic information to be found. Most of it is common sense...

joenkim
February 21st, 2007, 8:44am
I don't mind the schools notifying parents, but I DO mind if they tell the students. I have an 11 year old girl who is not overweight, but after Christmas she tells me that she wants to go on a diet. Why??? Because she does not have a stick straight little boy figure like most of the other girls. She was born with hips. They are not going to go away. The last thing young girls need is to become obsessed with weight at an impressionable age, leading to eating disorders.

Yes, parents should know when there is a potential problem so that they can deal with it, NOT the children.

Exactly.

At the same time, the schools need to offer PE and/or recess every day...even if it's just 30 minutes!

My daughter's middle school has mandatory PE every day for every student. That's an hour a day. And the best part is, the students don't HAVE to participate in a certain sport. If the students (mainly girls) feel like doing nothing more than walking around the track, they can walk around the track and gab with their freinds. But they have to maintain a 3 mph speed!

I think that's a really great idea. BTW, my daughter's school has very, very few overweight students.

feefee
February 21st, 2007, 8:58am
Well some of us clearly deserve the parent of the year award. :rolleyes:

We do not have junk food in our house, except for the occasional batch of cookies I might make. Our meals are nutritious, my son plays baseball in the Summer, basketball in the Winter. He also takes drum lessons weekly and practices for an hour a day. He knows about nutrition and excercise - he sees me active and watching what I eat daily. We take the dog for an hour walk every single evening. Yet he is still overweight. His physicals all come back as normal, as far as having no chemical imbalance that causes it.

I guess it's my fault for not producing what the schools consider a specimen of physical perfection. I guess I need the school to tell me that my kid is fat and neglected by me because of it. Call me stupid and blind; send me the letter in case I am unaware of it. I have a kid who is clearly predisposed to being heavier than average and it's obvious that I must be doing something wrong.

I take serious offense to it - I understand all too well about more and more kids being overwieght. I don't need the friggin' schools policing it. THEY are failing in soooo many other areas of importance.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 9:03am
The last two years we had our son in Basketball, football and baseball. I missed baseball sign ups this year because, they wanted $100. I am watching for new sessions. Since moving here in August of last year I am still learning when sports and other activities are offered.

I sympathize with you feefee, even though my son was in sports and kept active he is still overweight.

jeepers
February 21st, 2007, 9:08am
I was always overweight and ate well and exercised.
I even had to have gastric bypass surgery because of getting up to 486 lbs.
Food wasn't the issue, not totally. It was also due to hypothyroidism.
How dare the schools send BMI report cards. School are places to get an education, not be ridiculed because of weight issues.

If the schools really want to do something... take out the fattening foods, soft drink machines, and bring back gym class.

aycorn
February 21st, 2007, 9:11am
the school isn't there to teach the parent anything..its there to teach the child skills to be used in the real world.. that being said..we already know thats not happening.. kids are ill prepared when they hit college, let alone the real world...

the parents are aware of what good/bad eating habits are.. how much exercise to get..etc..because many struggle with it themselves as adults.

i think it would be better practice if the school would have a period (50 min/day for 2 weeks?) in class to discuss the benefits of good nutrition ..power foods.. etc... keeping the focus on what healthy choices are.. WITHOUT giving mention or concentrating on what 'bad' foods are .. this way kids will focus on what they can have..not what they cant have ..and hopefully make better choices.

oh..just wanted to add..that many people actually eat reasonably..howver, they are just VERY SEDENTARY!!!! ..especially kids.. there are LOTS of really fat kids..and if you just look around at kids in a mall or a restaurant..your jaw will drop.. especially at the ones under 8 years old ..

ultimately, a child's health is up to his/her parents..unless he/she is a ward of the state.

ironbutterfly
February 21st, 2007, 9:15am
Every school should have a gym like the one in Supersize Me:yesyes:

I don't really see an end to it. Parents work too hard, too many jobs to prepare healthy foods every day, enough to undo the damage the nasty school lunches, no gym.

Bikes and parks, not safe to go alone anymore. Hell half the time the park near me isn't safe unless you have 10 people :laugh: Pollution is getting bad, UV alerts all the time, asthma on the up-rise, makes getting that target rate hard sometimes........

Out of ALL my friends, I know 2 families that can afford to go to gyms, and one is the Y. And uhhhhhhhhh, I have a lot more friends than that :rolleyes:

Not too mention the cost of eating well. I know a ton of people who haven't gotten raises in 2 years. Yet the gas goes up, everything else goes up. I swear it has taken me 3 years to figure out how to shop and cook healthy on a budget.

Do you use that coupon for $1 off Hamburger Helper if you buy 3 boxes. Those boxes are on sale $3 for $3. That means you got 3 for $2. One box of Annies All Natural No Preservatives added costs $1.59 For 4 1/2 cup servings. You can buy gross American Process Cheese Food Slices on sale for $1.29, it has 30 ingredients in it. Or you can buy some real sliced cheddar, made with only 3 ingredients, half the amount of slices, for $2.99 :worry:

I don't know the answer, it a gigantic problem with many contributing factors :worry:

rdhill007
February 21st, 2007, 9:26am
The kids lunch menu here(I read in the newspaper because I homeschool) has items like cheeseburgers, cheesesteaks, chicken nuggets(baked), and the pizza is served every Friday. Ironically, the menus are approved by a nutritionist. Where is the healthy eating there? The only thing that I see is sodium and fat in the above.

The gym class is down to 30 minutes a week because of budget cuts and insurance purposes.

Parents are now asked to pay for their kids to participate in sports. Middle school sports and freshman sports are non-existant. Only the ones who can afford it let their kids play little league, soccer, football, ect. because those fees are up to $50 a kid, then there is the buy out for the candy that everyone is required to sell. Plus the cost of transportation for the traveling teams.

mcclave
February 21st, 2007, 9:34am
I don't agree with the report cards at all however......

I am appalled by th fact that so many children are so over weight in this country. It's a form of child abuse. (Putting on flame suit now) With so many single parent homes and homes with both parents working the trend has become to eat what is convenient and easy not what is healthy. I wonder is it worth having all those little extras at the expense of children's health? Sitting around the family table and eating a healthy home cooked meal is a thing most Americans don't do very often anymore.

sissy76
February 21st, 2007, 9:36am
I think that parents should have some accountability for their children being overweight.
Children should be outside playing and not in front of the T.V. and video game systems eating junk!! Especially under the age of 10!

tybeth
February 21st, 2007, 9:42am
If the schools really want to do something... take out the fattening foods, soft drink machines, and bring back gym class.

I guess I don't mind that they send the info home. That's fine with me as long as they don't share it the info with my son. I feel it's my place to discuss it with him. But I agree with what straycat said if the school really wants to do something get rid of the flippin soda and snack machines and bring back gym class. My 5th grader only has gym every 4 days. That's it. They also don't offer sports until 7th grade.

I think the schools have good intentions but what's the point in saying hey your kid is fat when they have the vending machines and no gym class? I mean if their intention is to help parents by bringing it to their attention wouldn't getting rid of the machines be a bigger help?

I hope that came out the way I intended.

Okay so here's my story....my 5th grader is overweight. It just kills me to see him that way but seriously I am doing the best I can. He is not allowed to drink soda at home. He can have one juice box a day during the week and 2 a day on the weekends. He is allowed 2 snacks a day from his jar on the weekends. Any other snacks come out of the fruit basket and are unlimited.

When I went on Weight Watchers a couple of years ago I used the information from there to talk about nutrition with him. Now that I have gestational diabetes I have used it as an oppotunity to discuss nutrition and obesity with him. I think our problem comes from the way his dad eats. His dad doesn't have anything to do with fruits or vegetables and allows our son to drink 20 oz bottles of Mt. Dew. Plus he dad isn't big into cooking so they eat a lot of fast food. Plus regarding the vending machines at school, I wouldn't let my son take any money to school with him because the couple of dollars I would give him "just in case he needed it" I found out he was spending in the vending machine to buy 20 oz. bottles of Coke.

Now to the poster who said something about if the child has gotten to the point of being fat then the parent has lost control - I will have to go back and find the quote, In my home I have not lost control, but I simply cannot control every outside factor. I have tried talking to his dad about his habits and limiting the amount of fat and sugar our son has. But I just don't think he realizes how much he lets our son eat. At home I dish out his plate so I control his portions. At his dad's he's allowed to eat as much as he wants of the pizza, chicken strips, etc. that they eat. So you tell me what exactly am I supposed to do???

Sorry so long..didn't realize how much the subject got to me....

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 9:42am
i think it would be better practice if the school would have a period (50 min/day for 2 weeks?) in class to discuss the benefits of good nutrition ..power foods.. etc... keeping the focus on what healthy choices are.. WITHOUT giving mention or concentrating on what 'bad' foods are .. this way kids will focus on what they can have..not what they cant have ..and hopefully make better choices..

I am all for teaching nutrition in the school as long as it didn't involve bluntly telling the child he/she is fat. :gvibes:

jproselin
February 21st, 2007, 9:48am
This reminds me of elementary school when we would be lined up outside the nurse's office to be weighed and measured (height).

As an adult, I know my BMI and am working on getting it to a healthy number. As a parent, I have cut out most of the high fat, high sodium, processed foods from the house. Not because my children have high BMIs, but because I want them to learn how to eat and live healthy. I don't want them to think you eat whatever you want and then do a 6 month starvation or liquid protein diet to get back to where you can eat anything again.

I would be upset if a teacher stood my child up in front of a class and said "Johnny is fat and he is going to die young." But to have a number given to you is not a insult to your parenting.

My DH didn't know he had gotten heavy enough to be listed as overweight until he got his BMI from his doctor. Now he is exercising and eating better.

Hhhyyyddd
February 21st, 2007, 9:52am
I am not sure what I think about this. Health is a subject that is taught at school, and weight is a health issue. I know that people have said in this thread "people know if their kids are overweight" and I don't think that is neccesarily true. The schools already do vision and hearing checks, scoliosis tests, random lice checks during outbreaks, make sure the kids' vaccinations are up to date, etc. so it's not unprecedented for the school to take a role in health care.

I know that we all tend to take things personally, we see and interpret the world through our own eyes. My knee-jerk reaction was this is more government interference in people's lives, but then I thought of my chronic dinner guest, The dinners she has here are the only hot meals she gets besides school and fast food. Not everyone knows or cares how or what to feed their kids. A note from school probably won't do much to help that, but it might.

Maudrey74
February 21st, 2007, 9:53am
:worry: Who are you trying to blame for your child being overweight? The school? Come on... really. Its not the schools fault. Can't anyone take responsibility for their own actions? My sons school has soda and snack machines, but he isn't overweight. He would rather snack on fruits and have a glass of milk or water. Healthy eatting habits starts at home IMO.

ironbutterfly
February 21st, 2007, 9:54am
I imagine somewhere down the line it will affect adults too.:yesyes:

Like your BMI on your pay stub if you are under an employer provided insurance plan. Or on your SSI or disability payment. After all added weight can't help bad backs, knees, breathing problems and diabetes etc.......

Although I will say, on the other hand maybe it will make people aware of their children that have eating disorders and are severely underweight for their age. :gvibes:

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 9:56am
You want to know a secret? It really sucks but, I am flying out to Vegas on Saturday morning for my sisters wedding. My dh is not a cooker and has never been left for more than a day alone with the kids soooooo, I had to get some things he could make to feed the kids. I went and used my free food coupons yest. to help with easy cooking. He can either make them TV dinners, sandwhiches, hot dogs, etc. this weekend. I made sure that I bought the TV dinners with veggies and stuff to help some. Food is one issue, I just hope he can survive the weekend alone taking care of the kids :laugh: I told him I did it for a long time, he can do it for 2 days.

rdhill007
February 21st, 2007, 9:59am
Food is one issue, I just hope he can survive the weekend alone taking care of the kids :laugh: I told him I did it for a long time, he can do it for 2 days.

Amen to that!!!

snowbabyboo
February 21st, 2007, 9:59am
Let me see if I got this right........... :sherlock:

Parents want the schools to bring back Gym class/exercise.......

Get rid of the coke and snack machines in schools.......

Provide a more nutritional meal at lunch time.........

but at home.......

they sit on their lazy butts in front of the tv/video game for hours at a time
and
eat junk food when the parents arent home or when the kids are hanging out at the mall.
(and what are the parents packing in the kids lunches??)

Then the parents get pissed when the school wants to step in a little??? :rolleyes:



What happens next summer when ''Little Johnny" is outside running in Gym class, and has a heart attack and dies because he is extremly overweight?? WHO's fault is that going to be???

ETA: I dont agree with actually giving the report to the child. It should be mailed at home to the parents.

Trix
February 21st, 2007, 10:01am
Considering that obesity is a very real HEALTH THREAT, I see nothing wrong with schools sending something to parents. I definitely don't think they should give the info directly to the kids, for obvious reasons. But I think people need to stop being oversensitive about the aesthetic aspect of being overweight and look at the health aspect. I don't see how schools sending notice should be taken as some personal insult about someone's looks. It's a health concern for the child.

Schools have always played some part in looking after children's health. Lice checks, anyone? I would like to see much more PE in schools - and they need to get the trashy processed crap out of the lunch room as well.

Whether the word is coming down from schools or not, I think we all must know by now that we do need to do something about this problem. But we defeat our own selves before we even start. We have such a collective "victim" mentality in this country. Nothing is our fault, we get nasty with anyone suggesting we take personal responsibility for anything, and someone else should make needed changes, not us. Anything requiring effort is met with wholesale whining and excuses. But the fact remains that for HEALTH reasons - nevermind what people think of looks - most people need to change their ways.

We are not overweight here but I am trying to change how we eat, for our health. Yes, it's harder to work out preparing healthier meals from scratch, especially for a non-cook like me, and I can whine about how I don't have the time or whatever, but that's just an excuse and I know it. Everyone's got time for the TV and computer...well then they've got time to learn to shop and cook better. It's not easy at first but it can be done. And we definitely need to turn off the electronics and get outside more (myself included!).

Obesity wasn't an epidemic back when kids mostly played outside and families ate less processed, fatty junk for their meals and didn't suck down sodas all day long. Common sense should tell us what the problem is here and what to do about it.

Maddgiggler
February 21st, 2007, 10:06am
I disagree with BMI report cards. I don't think the schools should be involved to that extent. Teaching about healthy living and offering healthy choices of food items for lunch/snack machines is one thing. I don't think they should be passing out BMI report cards or anything else that can single a child out for teasing or make them feel inferior in any way. Kids are so sensitive. At my 10yo last checkup the Dr said he should do some type of cardio during the winter to stay active since he's not outside playing. The suggestion had nothing to do with weight. No joke that it took me two months to make him understand that he is not overweight or fat.

If the schools choose to do BMI report cards I think that it needs to be kept low key. Results not passed out at school. Measurments not done in front of other children. I have mixed feelings about this because it's important for children to learn about health but it's better to teach the facts and basics in a fun way for kids. That will help them more in the future than giving them a "number".

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 10:10am
Ok, if they want to do BMI report cards and we have no choice in the matter this is what I personally would like to see. I would like it to be done in private, do not tell the child the scores, etc. and send the report cards in the mail or give in quarterly report cards so that the children do not see them.

zelda
February 21st, 2007, 10:11am
I was always overweight and ate well and exercised.
I even had to have gastric bypass surgery because of getting up to 486 lbs.
Food wasn't the issue, not totally. It was also due to hypothyroidism.
How dare the schools send BMI report cards. School are places to get an education, not be ridiculed because of weight issues.

If the schools really want to do something... take out the fattening foods, soft drink machines, and bring back gym class.


It is possible they are doing it for parents that aren't aware if their child has a physicla problem (like a problem with hypertension), so the parent will take the child to the dr. and make sure there is nothing else wrong.....

I know many parents that have overweight children. They never take they chid to the dr. to see why (if it is because of poor nutrition, or some type of illness).....They just think their child is over weight...and don't even think it could be from anything physical, so they don't take them ot the dr.

Alot of these parents are overweight themselves, and don't even try to do anything to try and help their children lose weight, let alone help themselves. Maybe if someone else says something, they will feel embarrased enough that they will start trying ot help their child and not be so apathetic about it....


I know there are many parents who do whatever they can, and are continually trying ot help their children remain fit and healthy, but there are just as many who do nothing.

Trix
February 21st, 2007, 10:12am
If the schools choose to do BMI report cards I think that it needs to be kept low key. Results not passed out at school. Measurments not done in front of other children.
Definitely. Give the info to the parents and let them handle it. Parents should be teaching healthy habits and leading by example (of course we all often fail at that, but we should still try ;)). Seeds planted in youth do sprout in time, so plant those seeds. It'd be a lot more beneficial for the kids to have parents do that than to get defensive and surly about school notices. The most important thing here is the welfare of the child. We all need to remember that.

astromynx
February 21st, 2007, 10:19am
I have never heard of schools doing that. I'm sure if they checked my daughter, they'd send her home a greasy cheeseburger with her report because she's such a beanpole.

zelda
February 21st, 2007, 10:29am
The kids lunch menu here(I read in the newspaper because I homeschool) has items like cheeseburgers, cheesesteaks, chicken nuggets(baked), and the pizza is served every Friday. Ironically, the menus are approved by a nutritionist. Where is the healthy eating there? The only thing that I see is sodium and fat in the above.

The gym class is down to 30 minutes a week because of budget cuts and insurance purposes.

Parents are now asked to pay for their kids to participate in sports. Middle school sports and freshman sports are non-existant. Only the ones who can afford it let their kids play little league, soccer, football, ect. because those fees are up to $50 a kid, then there is the buy out for the candy that everyone is required to sell. Plus the cost of transportation for the traveling teams.



I don't see a proble mwith any one of those foods, unless that is the type of foods that the child is eating mass amounts of on a continual basis....

I eat cheeseburgers, chicken nuggest, mozzarella sticks, and pizza....Prob. each one at least once a week....and I have lost 27 pounds since last May....I take walks with my kids, they ride bikes run around outside and have snow ball fights in winter , water gun fights in summer, and do a lot of swimming.



There isn't any food that anyone should have to cut out of their diet completely (unless they can't have it for a health reason). People just have to learn what a healthy amount of that item is, and learn healthy portion sizes..

A cheeseburger, or pizza once or even twice a week isn't going to hurt anyone, unless that is the type of food they are eating all week long.

Yes I am also awar that some schools have scaled back P.E. (luckily my child's school has not done this, and my kids have daily P.E.) but it really is the parent's reponsibility to make sure you child gets the excercise they need. Take your child for a bike ride, or walk....Or even have your child run laps around your house (my oldest son used to like to do this).

My children play outside regularly...They are allowed pizza, burgers, etc. and they even eat cafeteria foods.....it is all done in moderation. My kids are very healthy active kids.....A good diet is alot more about how you eat, and how much food you eat rather than what you eat.

cdecee
February 21st, 2007, 10:34am
I have no problem with BMI screening and think it's a good thing. I feel the same way about a vision, hearing and scoliosis check. I don't believe the results should be sent home with the child, though, as there is too much pressure on kids reveal and compare the results. They should be mailed to the parent. It's a merely a 'heads up' to the parents regarding a potential problem! The parents can then choose to either ignore or follow up the results with their pediatrician. I don't understand how people are finding it so intrusive or offensive. If a school vision screening indicated that my child might have a problem, I would be grateful for the 'heads up' - not raising hell.

The fact is that many parents are clueless (or claim to be clueless) as to what is contributing to a child's weight problem. Just take a look at the lawsuits against fast food establishments from people claiming they didn't know that they would get fat from eating certain foods! For some parents and children the BMI screen results will lead to a better understanding of nutrition.

I can't speak for all schools, but I know that there is a pretty good selection at my children's school. If there wasn't and my child was at risk, then I would seriously consider sending them with a lunch from home. For example, I choose to send my children to school with powerade or gatorade (they've been removed from school vending machines) for after school sports because that is what my children need. A parent has to be in tune with the needs of their individual child and make the necessary adjustments for the best possible outcome for that child. :twocents:

Marie
February 21st, 2007, 10:43am
Has everyone who responded here actually received the BMI letter from the school? It states, "BMI should be considered a screening tool and not a definitive measure of overweight and obesity as the indicator does have limitations." It goes on to say, "Your child's health care provider is the best person to evaluate whether or not his measurements are within a healthy range." It also lists a web address to the CDC for more explanation.

All they're doing is providing you with information. What you choose to do (or not do) with it is up to you as a parent. It arrives via USPS addressed to the parents/guardians. Your child has no inkling what their BMI is, where they fall on the chart, or anything else unless you explain it to them. Nowhere on my letter does it state, "Your child is fat/skinny/normal.". It lists the risks for being both underweight and overweight. If you think your child cannot handle it, understand it, or you don't agree with it, then don't tell them. But sometimes we don't see what's right before our eyes. Example: The pants that fit my child last month fall well above the ankle today. Where did that half an inch come from?

Schools screen for hearing, vision, scoliosis, and lice, too. If the school nurse called and your child had lice (which is immediate dismissal), if your child failed the hearing test, if your child's teacher sent home a note that your child is squinting to see the blackboard, would you say that's none of their business? They're all pieces of information. As with anything, take what you need and leave the rest.

Personally, I'm grateful for the extra set of eyes looking out for my child's well-being.

Marie

caseycupcake
February 21st, 2007, 10:51am
As an overweight child, I certainly didn't need to have the school confirm that I was overweight. My chronically depressed mother and alcoholic father, both detached parents on their good days, were well aware that I was fat. They reminded me constantly. That was the one thing that teachers didn't criticize me about.

If schools are concerned about a students health, they shouldn't be cutting back on gym class and eliminating recess. DS carries around a few extra pounds. He knows it. He doesn't need me or the school to tell him. We have mirrors; he's not blind. We joke that the most exercise he gets in gym class is his changing into his gym clothes. The high school doesn't care. :worry:

amann1
February 21st, 2007, 10:52am
Have any of you seen that show on TLC, Honey We're Killing the Kids! (http://tlc.discovery.com/fansites/honey/honey.html)?

The gist of the show is this: A family is shown living their lives as they normally do, eating, playing video games, watching TV, etc. A nutritionist comes in and, based on the children's diet and activity level, predicts what they'll look like as they get older. She also predicts the likely lifespan of the children if they continue living the way they do. It is usually horrifying for the parents to see their children as an unhealthy adult that may not live to see their 60th birthday. For the most part, the parents have no idea how much damage they are causing to their childrens' health. So the nutritionist sets up a plan to correct the bad habits and improve the family's health. At the end of the show, an alternate projection is shown, with the children leading healthful lives and living much longer.

From watching this show, it is extremely clear that some parents are oblivious to the harm they are causing their children. They acknowledge that their children are a bit overweight, but are unable to see how bad eating habits as a child will turn into bad eating habits as an adult. A lifetime of imperfect nutrition and low activity will inevitably lead to nutrition-related health problems and possibly premature death.

I don't know if this show is still airing, but if you haven't seen it, try to find a way to watch it. Like a BMI report card, it could be enlightening. Anything that gets you to put some extra thought into the health of your child should be seen as a benefit.

bizzybee
February 21st, 2007, 11:23am
I have worked in home daycare in the past (11yrs) and substituted at an elementary school for the past five years. I have found that most parents are aware of and try to meet their children's needs. However, there are still many who would benefit from this information. If a report card is given, it should be kept private and mailed to the home. If the parent chooses to discuss it with the child it is their decision. Unfortunately schools are not always great at protecting a child's self-esteem. Many teachers still announce out loud who did not pass their test and put names on the board of children who are not paying attention, etc.

bumbeeboo
February 21st, 2007, 11:39am
Yeah I get that letter every year. And every year it states that my two children are in the 90% of being overweight. I look at it and laugh because both my children are extremely tall for their ages and wear slim sized jeans. You can't really take that information too seriously.

But if you guys remember when a Mother was trying to sue McDonald's because she stated that the food there mad her child fat. I guess she ate there everyday. Well, there are those people out there too and I think they are, in the most part, trying to target those people.

MrsM
February 21st, 2007, 11:47am
Has everyone who responded here actually received the BMI letter from the school?



All they're doing is providing you with information. What you choose to do (or not do) with it is up to you as a parent. It arrives via USPS addressed to the parents/guardians. Your child has no inkling what their BMI is, where they fall on the chart, or anything else unless you explain it to them. Nowhere on my letter does it state, "Your child is fat/skinny/normal.". It lists the risks for being both underweight and overweight. If you think your child cannot handle it, understand it, or you don't agree with it, then don't tell them. But sometimes we don't see what's right before our eyes. Example: The pants that fit my child last month fall well above the ankle today. Where did that half an inch come from?

Schools screen for hearing, vision, scoliosis, and lice, too. If the school nurse called and your child had lice (which is immediate dismissal), if your child failed the hearing test, if your child's teacher sent home a note that your child is squinting to see the blackboard, would you say that's none of their business? They're all pieces of information. As with anything, take what you need and leave the rest.

Personally, I'm grateful for the extra set of eyes looking out for my child's well-being.

Marie

I have to agree. I just got the lice letter too.

You get the lice letters, the hearing, etc. like you said, how bad it is to smoke, do drugs, etc. Yet parents get so defensive because their kids are overweight and probably unhealthy. Makes no sense to me.

If someone tells me I shouldn't smoke, because of second hand smoke, I see nothing wrong with a nurse or someone telling you your child is overweight. It's the parents fault for making them heavy, just like the parent's fault for smoking, unless of course there is a medical condition. 9 times out of 10 I'm sure there isn't.

Now this post deserves a big :munch:

aireheart
February 21st, 2007, 1:26pm
:mad2: I don't think it is right. If they want to present the information then it should be presented privately in a parent-teacher conference. This way there can be some education and discussion maybe with a school nurse etc. It needs to be helpful. Most folks know if they are overweight there needs to be counseling and not just a hey your overweight. Schools should focus on getting the kids active and insuring the food available is high quality and not offer vending machines with candy bars, soda and let fast food restaraunts (hmm didn't spell that right :laugh: ) set up shop in them.

I totally agree that they will let anyone walk out of a hospital with a child, raise them to be 5 and then we are unfit as parents to make any further decisions. This country is out of hand.

Wasn't there a NJ boy about 16 that had cancer and it reoccurred after they sought treatment the first time. After discussing things the parents and the boy decided that they would try alternative treatments instead and I believe they were brought up on neglect charges and they forced the boy into a second round of chem. This country is by no means free anymore and it is only going to get worse unless individuals stand up as a group.

Government shouldn't be in the business of making decisions for us. If they find a procedure or medicine or vaccine has great promise then they should work to make it affordable to those who seek it and not force us to use it. :mad2:

Sorry, these things really get me worked up anymore.

girlsmith
February 21st, 2007, 1:36pm
i think it's a great idea. maybe then the parents will take some responsibility & say no to the video games, and make the kids play outside like we did growing up. That should shed a few pounds.

missreneer
February 21st, 2007, 1:46pm
I wanted to add that I am obsessed with my weight so I know what these overweight kids are going through and feel. Being a public display is just wrong. (BMI checks by schools)

I agree. It is going to give them a complex and is going to lead to eating and exercising disorders.

shivas105
February 21st, 2007, 1:51pm
I have never heard of schools doing that. I'm sure if they checked my daughter, they'd send her home a greasy cheeseburger with her report because she's such a beanpole.



haha - the same with my little ones!!! :laugh:

Scooterino
February 21st, 2007, 2:02pm
I disagree with that, it';s the 1st I've heard of that happening. I think it's between the parents and the child's physician, the school should stay out of it unless it is so extreme that it poses an immediate danger to the child, in which case they should involve cps.

AlwaysLate
February 21st, 2007, 2:05pm
I feel sorry for the kids that this will cause extra pressure to be put on. When I was growing up, if I brought home a report card with four A's and one B my dad would look at it and say "well, next time you'll do better". I can't imagine if he'd been getting letters that I was chubby. 'well, you're BMI is 23. Next time let's see it down at 20'. I was bulemic for a year and a half of high school. When I moved out of my dad's house, I recovered very quickly. Some of us got a lot of pressure in school to be perfect and letters like that would only make it worse.

I'm surprised at the number of people who think PE is such a good thing. It was a nightmare for me. I was bullied and picked on because I was uncoordinated and lousy at team sports. I got more exercise walking briskly to class than I ever did in PE. Most of the time I sat on a bench or stood in a field praying that the ball didn't come toward me.

jus_like_honey
February 21st, 2007, 2:20pm
If the schools are so worried about "fat" kids, why don't they remove soda and snack machines? It is the parents' jobs at home to watch what their children eat, but they can't do that the hours their children attend school! I was far from an overweight child, but every day, I used my lunch money to eat candy for lunch! My parents didn't know, of course, but if they had they would have been upset. We give kids too much opportunity with temptation so close. The only thing this BMI report card is going to do is make kids feel even worse for having a weight problem, which I'm sure the thinner kids at school have already pointed out :frown3: We also need to start controlling bullying, teaching tolerance and that diversity is okay. Kids see damaging things on t.v. every day, can we say Paris? No one can live up to that image, which makes teenage girls who are an average weight feel fat because they are not as thin as those celebrities. They are setting an unhealthy standard for little girls, teens and even older women. I know I feel selfconcious about it!

bomar97
February 21st, 2007, 2:27pm
I was always overweight in school.. I was also taller than anyone else, maybe my parents should have put me in a vise at night so I didn't exceed the average height for me age???

The school system can start by feeding healthy meals to the kids like we had! The meals were affordable and weren't all fruit and yogurt.. but no soda or candy crap in vending machines, etc.. you're there to learn, not to eat junk food!

The other thing is to get phys ed back in.. what ever happened to that? Geez, did the cost of everything go up so much that the schools can't afford to give our kids a well rounded education? Why, back when I went to school (I know :laugh: )... we had pencils, paper and everything supplied by the school! All our books stayed in school in elementary, unless we had to bring them home for homework.. same with the books staying in the lockers once in jr. high.. no backpacks needed! We could carry whatever we needed home with us in our arms after school!

The kids just aren't learning... and the financial burden is falling on the student's parents.. he/she needs to have this that and the other thing! BS!!!!

Get back to basics... get the school budget $$ going into what is needed to teach the kids! This country is going downhill! Foreign students are coming to this country to get what they consider an excellent education in college.. students who've learned a lot in their country plus our language! Our own kids can't even spell or write a letter!

nvtribefan
February 21st, 2007, 2:30pm
Has everyone who responded here actually received the BMI letter from the school? It states, "BMI should be considered a screening tool and not a definitive measure of overweight and obesity as the indicator does have limitations." It goes on to say, "Your child's health care provider is the best person to evaluate whether or not his measurements are within a healthy range." It also lists a web address to the CDC for more explanation.

All they're doing is providing you with information. What you choose to do (or not do) with it is up to you as a parent. It arrives via USPS addressed to the parents/guardians. Your child has no inkling what their BMI is, where they fall on the chart, or anything else unless you explain it to them. Nowhere on my letter does it state, "Your child is fat/skinny/normal.". It lists the risks for being both underweight and overweight. If you think your child cannot handle it, understand it, or you don't agree with it, then don't tell them. But sometimes we don't see what's right before our eyes. Example: The pants that fit my child last month fall well above the ankle today. Where did that half an inch come from?

Schools screen for hearing, vision, scoliosis, and lice, too. If the school nurse called and your child had lice (which is immediate dismissal), if your child failed the hearing test, if your child's teacher sent home a note that your child is squinting to see the blackboard, would you say that's none of their business? They're all pieces of information. As with anything, take what you need and leave the rest.

Personally, I'm grateful for the extra set of eyes looking out for my child's well-being.

Marie

There you go, trying to muddle the discussion with facts. :gvibes:

Trix
February 21st, 2007, 2:31pm
There's an awful lot of projecting going on here.

This is about the kids' health. Period. And it's already been shown that the letter goes to the parents directly, so there goes the concern about kids throwing it in each other's faces. It is no different than being notified your kid has lice or eyesight problems. It is a HEALTH ISSUE. That is all this is about, nothing else.

If you feel your school is giving out crap food and drinks, talk to them. We do not have soda machines in school here. Band with other parents and get them removed if it's actually a concern to you; don't just sit around complaining about it.

If you get the letter, do as you will with it. It is your choice as the parent. Just remember that defensiveness and denial solves nothing, and it sure won't help the kids in any way at all.

cdecee
February 21st, 2007, 2:58pm
:mad2: I don't think it is right. If they want to present the information then it should be presented privately in a parent-teacher conference. This way there can be some education and discussion maybe with a school nurse etc. It needs to be helpful. Most folks know if they are overweight there needs to be counseling and not just a hey your overweight. Schools should focus on getting the kids active and insuring the food available is high quality and not offer vending machines with candy bars, soda and let fast food restaraunts (hmm didn't spell that right :laugh: ) set up shop in them.

In most cases this information IS private with a letter sent directly to the parents after the school nurse privately screens the student. The teachers don't receive the letters so why would you want to make it less private by making the teachers privy to BMI results???

*For the most part, schools are already trying to make healthier changes in the school diet. If you don't like it, pack your child a lunch!
*Budget cuts are a reality and school systems prioritize basic education needs over extra-curricular activities (as they should). If parents want their kid physically active then get them involved in something on their own. After all the ultimate responsibility for the overall well being of the child lies with the parent.
*Most schools (all?)are required to have a nurse and counselor. The nurse takes care of our children when they fall ill and also conducts these medical screenings. The counselors are there for the emotional needs of our children should it be required. I think that with the amount of other problems that exist today, expecting these professionals to now put on the "Jenny Craig" hat is ridiculous. Again, the ultimate responsibility for the overall well being of the child lies with the parent.

The school system's number one priority is to educate and they are constantly put in the position of providing for children because the parents are failing to do their jobs as parents. Seems to me that you are angry about government intruding into the role of parents' lives while at the same time demanding that the school take over areas that all parents should be providing. Can't have it both ways.

suelee000
February 21st, 2007, 2:59pm
two words "Eating Disorder"

sparkleygem
February 21st, 2007, 3:03pm
When, after ten years of borderline hypertension, I had a Kaiser doctor finally care enough to confront me and emphasize (I'm 55) that I need to start taking BP medicine and seriously need to take all the other widely understood steps (reduce caloric intake, sodium consumption, and weight), my first impulse was to dislike him. He's fat himself, after all. Ten minutes later I was over it, and appreciated a corporate doc who finally stepped up.

We've been over this topic several times now, and many of you are wrapping yourselves in some kind of libertarian / patriotic / spirit of personal freedom flag in the discussion. Hey, have YOU called Jenny yet?

If your kid gets a bad BMI score...who are you going to call? You want to debate the effect of...the TRUTH...on your beloved overweight kids? Shoot the messenger? Yap about a slippery slope, how our benign ignorance is denied a foothold? Come on people. Visit Japan and the public toilets will read your beads for you. Go ahead and piddle into the wind, it's refreshing!

There must be a public school system that will still let Johnny buy cokes and become as obese as home cooking allows. If not, there's always home schooling. My doctor gave me a mitzvah, and your kids are getting one too, imho.

Schools didn't just grasp this idea (of BMI scores) like a straw in the wind. Don't you think there is sound research behind it...a clear pattern of students growing fatter and fatter each year, porky 12 year olds with BP higher than mine?

Cigarettes, booze, drugs...if schools were to advise parents of children using those substances...it would be all cool, because they are nominally illegal whereas being fat is legal? I've already heard these arguments, and there's a hole in that crock.

I'm sick of this huge "enabling" backlash of fat people trying to feel good about themselves...by obscuring the medical facts, and perpetrating this self-esteem hoax. Being fat doesn't mean we're not sexy, or smart and fun and worthy. But we're still fat, and that's seriously unhealthy.
Very true, thank you. You'd think most people know what is or isn't healthy, but then, you see these extremely unhealthy kids all over the place, GUZZLING sodas and IHALING pizza and cheeseburgers and fries all day long, and then the mom who gives the kid this crap says it isn't her fault.
Sometimes I'll be out somewhere and I'll see a family, and they'll have like 3 or 4 kids, ranging from 3 - 15, and every single kid is vastly overweight. I don't mean a little extra pudge, I mean morbidly obese. And then I wonder "if someone told this woman that her kids were too heavy, would she do anything about it?" And no, it's NOT a hormonal problem. Not when you're talking about an entire family. Not when you're talking about a 4 year old kid who waddles, rather than walks.
There is no excuse for feeding a kid junk food all day long. No time to cook? Feed the kid an apple, a banana, some grapes - it doesn't have to be pre-packaged garbage.
Obviously they came up with this thing for a reason. And that reason was not to hurt anyone, but to help. People can say it's none of their business all they want, it doesn't change anything. Your kid is still unhealthy. Change it. Feeding a growing child CRAP all day should be illegal. You are slowly killing your child. SOMEONE needs to tell you, who is it gonna be?? The school who spends half the day watching your unhealthy kid fall asleep in class?

The only problem I have with it is; the school feeds the kids crap, too. What's their excuse? They tell the parent the kid is unhealthy, but they take no part in helping fix the problem. Perhaps someone should send THEM a note as well.

Miki
February 21st, 2007, 3:10pm
I am excited and thought of no better place than to post in this thread. It just got really warm, in the 70's!!! It has been so cold. Now, when my kids come home I can let them jump on the trampoline and ride bikes until it gets dark. Homework can wait tonight, it's much needed playtime today! :cheer7: :jump: :cheer7: And mommy is getting out on that trampoline with them. :smile9:

TeaAddict
February 21st, 2007, 3:15pm
I don't think it should be the school's responsiblity. The school's responsiblity to teach children to be well educated. Part of the reason why kids are fat is because of the junk that is served in most schools & eliminating PE. It should be the child's pediatrician/family doctor's job to tell the parent(s) that their child is overweight.

jellosheriff
February 21st, 2007, 3:16pm
when people cost the system money, it'll find a way to correct that problem. Why should you have to pay for others self abuse. Accountability and responsibility are key words here. Should we protect ourselves from ourselves??? :sherlock:

Even though this isn't on topic per se, I just have to say that I don't understand the mentality that says that being fat costs other people money. That would assume that all fat people are uninsured and need state-sponsored medical care. :rolleyes:
I'm overweight, but I have no health problems, nor am I 'under' or 'un' insured.
The only medical care I've needed are surgery for a broken arm and a crown on a cracked tooth. I carry medical and dental insurance and pay the deductibles out of pocket. In fact, my insurance rates help to pay for other people who don't have insurance.
DH is the one with high cholesterol despite being fit and eating well. He's not costing anyone money either.

Back on topic...
I don't have a problem with this sort of report being sent to parents as long as they don't make a big deal about it. Kids go thru stages. My oldest was skinny for a long time and now has a bit of a paunch. He needs to step up his workouts at soccer practice to get back in shape. My middle son used to be a little soft around the middle, but is now very slim. (I think he's started noticing that girls are noticing him.) I see him making a conscious effort to choose the right foods in the right quantities and he's even decided to give up sweets with me for Lent... even though he's the one who least needs to do so.

Spiderella
February 21st, 2007, 3:16pm
That's crazy! :worry:

MrsM
February 21st, 2007, 3:19pm
The only problem I have with it is; the school feeds the kids crap, too. What's their excuse? They tell the parent the kid is unhealthy, but they take no part in helping fix the problem. Perhaps someone should send THEM a note as well.

If that's the case with someone's school, the parents should make the kid's lunch. It takes 5 minutes.

And I know my school made a complete meal turnaround. Too healthy!! Give the kid a freaking cupcake - but that's another thread!!!

zelda
February 21st, 2007, 3:21pm
I don't think it should be the school's responsiblity. The school's responsiblity to teach children to be well educated. Part of the reason why kids are fat is because of the junk that is served in most schools & eliminating PE. It should be the child's pediatrician/family doctor's job to tell the parent(s) that their child is overweight.

But it should also be the parent's reponsibility to make sure the kids get enough exercise (in regards to pe)...it would be nice if all schools could offer more physical activities for kids, but when they don't or can't it's up to the parents to make sure that their kids get the excercise they need.

okibrat
February 21st, 2007, 3:57pm
Have any of you seen that show on TLC, Honey We're Killing the Kids! (http://tlc.discovery.com/fansites/honey/honey.html)?

The gist of the show is this: A family is shown living their lives as they normally do, eating, playing video games, watching TV, etc. A nutritionist comes in and, based on the children's diet and activity level, predicts what they'll look like as they get older. She also predicts the likely lifespan of the children if they continue living the way they do. It is usually horrifying for the parents to see their children as an unhealthy adult that may not live to see their 60th birthday. For the most part, the parents have no idea how much damage they are causing to their childrens' health. So the nutritionist sets up a plan to correct the bad habits and improve the family's health. At the end of the show, an alternate projection is shown, with the children leading healthful lives and living much longer.

From watching this show, it is extremely clear that some parents are oblivious to the harm they are causing their children. They acknowledge that their children are a bit overweight, but are unable to see how bad eating habits as a child will turn into bad eating habits as an adult. A lifetime of imperfect nutrition and low activity will inevitably lead to nutrition-related health problems and possibly premature death.

I don't know if this show is still airing, but if you haven't seen it, try to find a way to watch it. Like a BMI report card, it could be enlightening. Anything that gets you to put some extra thought into the health of your child should be seen as a benefit.

my ds is 10 and he LOVES to watch this show with me!

i don't have a problem with the BMI reports, as long as they mail them to the parents, and the kids aren't involved in the results.

after watching 'honey we're killing the kids', and being around many other families with children, it's STUNNING to see some of the eating habits out there!

like much of the information that comes from school, it's a tool that can help educate those who honestly don't know any better. if it doesn't apply to me and my kids, i ignore it.

i also wish they would have more p.e. time in school. neither of my kids is overweight, but i think it's great exercise and socialization.

i'm trying hard as a parent to overcome my own mom's 'imperfect' eating and physical activity habits. my mom did every diet out there, and we were not involved in sports. my mom tried very hard to teach us to eat in a balanced way--but it was 'do as i SAY, not as i do'. she tried her best with the knowledge she had in the 1970's.

not every parent gets it...and there are many out there who see nothing wrong with 4 or 5 trips to mcdonald's a week(no offense intended toward anybody! :) ). there are still people out there my parents age who don't see any reason for car seats since they let their babies ride in their laps. do better when you know better. :gvibes:

okibrat
February 21st, 2007, 4:02pm
I am excited and thought of no better place than to post in this thread. It just got really warm, in the 70's!!! It has been so cold. Now, when my kids come home I can let them jump on the trampoline and ride bikes until it gets dark. Homework can wait tonight, it's much needed playtime today! :cheer7: :jump: :cheer7: And mommy is getting out on that trampoline with them. :smile9:

oh, i am SOOO jealous of your nice weather! i can't wait until we can stop wearing coats and sweatshirts here! :)

sparkleygem
February 21st, 2007, 5:19pm
If that's the case with someone's school, the parents should make the kid's lunch. It takes 5 minutes.

And I know my school made a complete meal turnaround. Too healthy!! Give the kid a freaking cupcake - but that's another thread!!!
True, they should. I make my kids' lunches. But it still really bothers me that the schools feed the kids the things they do. I've heard that some schools are trying to be more healthy, but I just don't think they're doing enough.

ironbutterfly
February 21st, 2007, 6:30pm
From what I learned in Supersize Me and the follow up book, Don't Eat This Book, the soda companies give money to schools on the condition that they are allowed to sell their product in school.:yesyes: Schools are broke, don't have extracurriculars, and big business is more than happy to help :worry:

jaklackus
February 21st, 2007, 6:40pm
I was always overweight and ate well and exercised.
I even had to have gastric bypass surgery because of getting up to 486 lbs.
Food wasn't the issue, not totally. It was also due to hypothyroidism.
How dare the schools send BMI report cards. School are places to get an education, not be ridiculed because of weight issues.

If the schools really want to do something... take out the fattening foods, soft drink machines, and bring back gym class.

I am gluten intolerant...I spent years listening to doctors lecturing to me about my weight...the only way I was ever able to lose weight was to either starve myself(less than 500 calories a day) or follow the Atkins induction diet....I had my thyroid tested it came back normal...I was offered anti depressants....not once did any doctor talk to me about celiac sprue or gluten intolerance or wheat allergies......I had to read an article in a magazine to figure out my problem.....the weight is falling off incredibly fast.....and I am eating more than I ever did before...just not foods that contain gluten. I was handed a gestational diabetes meal plan when I was pregnant with DS#2 (I did not have gestational diabetes I was just fat) and honest to god the meal plans listed allowed for 3-4 times the food per day than I normally would eat if left to my own to decide.

Before we start wagging fingers at fat people we really need to start testing people for thyroid problems and gluten intolerance before we label them as reckless overeaters.....perhaps we should rethink the bottom step of the food pyramid

Beth
February 21st, 2007, 6:44pm
Tsk, Tsk. I think there are bigger issues at the schools that need addressing. Yesterday.

pickle_breath
February 21st, 2007, 6:47pm
Just another small step towards an Orwell society.

2014 might be the real 1984.

Alimar
February 21st, 2007, 6:50pm
Is this common?? My kids have attended public school in 2 different states in the past year, and I've never heard of schools doing BMI reports.

Though, I could see something like that being done as part of P.E. or something, like when they did a fitness assessment for my husband at the YMCA when he signed up. My kids still have P.E. every other day, which I think is a good thing even though I always hated it myself! I would hope a report like that would be purely informational for the families, and not something the school planned to keep tabs on or put in the students' records.

triple*eee
February 21st, 2007, 7:22pm
If the BMI was listed along with all the other physical atributes (weight, height etc...) I see no problem with it.

If a child/teen is anorexic people are all up in arms about it but if a child is obese nobody dares say a word. Why? because it might hurt their feelings and self esteem. :worry:

Being an obese child (caused by over eating ) is just as harmful as being anorexic and both should be addressed.

Trix
February 21st, 2007, 7:38pm
If the BMI was listed along with all the other physical atributes (weight, height etc...) I see no problem with it.

If a child/teen is anorexic people are all up in arms about it but if a child is obese nobody dares say a word. Why? because it might hurt their feelings and self esteem. :worry:

Being an obese child (caused by over eating ) is just as harmful as being anorexic and both should be addressed.
Excellent point.

I think the real problem here lies within some of the parents who are very much projecting their own issues onto this. It's a health check and nothing more.

Just another small step towards an Orwell society.
I suppose lice checks were step #3,689,473 :rolleyes:

Nubbs820
February 21st, 2007, 7:50pm
I didn't read all of this thread so I'm not sure this has been covered or not. Some kids are naturally chubby before puberty. Some are chubby during the change from adolesence to past puberty. How can they deem a child overweight at these ages. I mean morbidly overweight, the child and parent already knows. But to tell a child between 5-10 years old that they are overweight is just going to increase the amount of children with eating disorders. My children aren't old enough to be in school yet, but when they are, if they came home with a paper saying they were fat, I'd yank them out of school in a heartbeat. Absofrigginglutely ridiculous! :mad2:

zelda
February 21st, 2007, 8:00pm
I didn't read all of this thread so I'm not sure this has been covered or not. Some kids are naturally chubby before puberty. Some are chubby during the change from adolesence to past puberty. How can they deem a child overweight at these ages. I mean morbidly overweight, the child and parent already knows. But to tell a child between 5-10 years old that they are overweight is just going to increase the amount of children with eating disorders. My children aren't old enough to be in school yet, but when they are, if they came home with a paper saying they were fat, I'd yank them out of school in a heartbeat. Absofrigginglutely ridiculous! :mad2:

They don't tell the child...They give the parents the information to do with what they will.

aycorn
February 21st, 2007, 8:36pm
actually on the dateline programlast night they DID inform the child of their bmi number..and showed kids who were concerned about it..

so in some cases the children do know..and discuss it when they go back in line and/or the classroom with the other children.

i'll try to find a link online to the program i was talking about..it was primetime hours tuesday night and i think on one of the major networks..but i really think it was a dateline type program.. i watched it after "to catch a predator" was on


edited to add i think it was from this cbs reporthttp://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/01/27/eveningnews/main2404798.shtml

unfortunately i cant find a list of yesterdays shows.. many of the tvlistings dont list what was playing yesterday!! argh

here's another article about it http://majikthise.typepad.com/majikthise_/2007/01/schools_launch_.html .

if you google bmi report card you also get lots of interesting articles about this.. as far back as 2004!


They don't tell the child...They give the parents the information to do with what they will.

jenninshelby
February 21st, 2007, 10:07pm
My son was a bit chunky through adolesence. Kids go through phases and we as parents know when our kids may be overweight and can handle it ourselves. He outgrew the pudginess and is now pretty slender.

With the B.M.I. report card they are trying to say we are stupid and don't know how to feed our kids. Not only that, I don't think it's emotionally healthy to give a young kid (especially a girl who is feeling all kinds of pressure from the media, etc. into thinking that if she isnt' stick thin she is worth nothing) a report card telling them that they are fat.

What's the point???? Let the child's doctor handle it if he/she thinks they are obese.


Exactly!! I think that is what upsets me about this most is I view this as an insult to parents. Like I would need someone else to tell me my kid is overweight?? Umm.. Hello!! Why not just call me stupid and a frigging idiot while you are at it!! :worry: :mad2:

Also if stuff like this would catch on the next step would be them trying to judge us and grade us on our parenting skills in various areas of our lives.. Heck.. They already try to tell us we cannot spank our kids.. What next? :frown3:

jenninshelby
February 21st, 2007, 10:35pm
I didn't read all of this thread so I'm not sure this has been covered or not. Some kids are naturally chubby before puberty. Some are chubby during the change from adolesence to past puberty. How can they deem a child overweight at these ages. I mean morbidly overweight, the child and parent already knows. But to tell a child between 5-10 years old that they are overweight is just going to increase the amount of children with eating disorders. My children aren't old enough to be in school yet, but when they are, if they came home with a paper saying they were fat, I'd yank them out of school in a heartbeat. Absofrigginglutely ridiculous! :mad2:


Also just because a child is over what their weight should be does not mean they are not healthy!! Same with adults.. There are plenty of adults who are over what their average weight should be and they are fine. Some of it really is just genetics sometimes.

Marie
February 21st, 2007, 11:14pm
There you go, trying to muddle the discussion with facts. :gvibes:

Perhaps each school is different. Or perhaps people are posting with emotion before reading the facts.

My child's report lists more than just a BMI score--height, weight, each with a percentage, conversion to cm and kg, date, and grade. And what to do with it all. Talk to your health care provider, visit the CDC website for more info, etc.

I'm wondering what people here do when someone tells them they have a piece of lettuce in their tooth or their fly is unzipped. It's almost akin to sticking your head in the sand. How dare someone give you information that could potentially help. :worry:

Marie

Indy
February 21st, 2007, 11:22pm
I think it is terrible! It is just another way to stigmatize and discriminate. Our kids, these days, are under way too much pressure as it is. Instead of making them feel worse...why not require all restaurants, food service, school lunch plans, etc. to totally eliminate all trans fats. Why not require them to provide only healthy food! Let's get the pop & snack machines out of the schools. Our local high school makes a tremendous amount of money on pop machines. So-before we go and stigmatize kids~why not nip it in the bud, and eliminate the things that are causing them to gain weight?

Has anyone recently seen what food courts on college campuses serve? Anyone would gain weight there! Lots of starchy, salty, fatty, very unhealthy foods!! Oh, and plenty of ice cream, cookies, pies, cakes, etc. for desserts. Soft drinks galore! Make your own sundae, milkshake, etc. and the kids can go back for as many helpings as they wish!

By the way, we recently went on a vacation and noted how much smaller people, in general, were in the 1800's. So-it seems to me, that people are getting bigger. Our ancestors were certainly smaller than we are. Maybe this is part of evolution. Who knows? And, why should we let others dictate what size our children should be? It just sounds so ridiculous. Where does it stop? Shouldn't they also check the BMI on teachers, administrators, politicians, taxpayers, ....where does it end? It just ridiculous!?!?!?

Thanks for bringing up this subject. I think whoever thought this one up has nothing better to do. Let's get the kids more active. I bet they would be more active, if we would just let them be kids! Don't make them carry adult burdens. Childhood is short. Let them enjoy it while they are kids.

nvtribefan
February 22nd, 2007, 12:50am
Or perhaps people are posting with emotion before reading the facts.


Say it ain't so, Joe. :halo:

Some people seem to be confusing a children's health issue with their adult appearance issues.

kidsareus
February 22nd, 2007, 1:49am
I see pros and cons to the BMI letters, but overall I think it's interesting that as our national obsession over body image and weight has increased over the past couple of decades, we are getting "larger" as a nation -- not smaller.


I think as a society, we all share some of the blame. For instance, I think we all need to be more supportive of kids as they learn to play sports. Kids should be encouraged to participate in sports throughout their lives both for the physical exercise and healthy competition. Right now, if a child isn't a top-notch athlete, there's very often "no place" for him or her to play. And very often, it's not the school officials or the other kids sending this message -- it's the parents!
My oldest son was in a recreational soccer league and loved it. His whole team had a blast, but they didn't win very often. The kids loved practicing, and they loved playing games, win or lose. But a few seasons in, some of the parents started getting a bit antsy about the whole thing. One dad would even yell out, "Hey, he's too short to be the goalie," every time it was my son's turn to rotate into the goalie position. Some of the other parents would chastise their own kids when they came off the field, telling them that they weren't trying hard enough! (This was recreational soccer -- and if those parents wanted a competitive league, there are several of those in our valley that they could have signed up for.)
As the kids on my son's team started getting older, they started dropping off the team. And it wasn't because they were joining the competitive teams. They were simply getting the message if they weren't winning, it wasn't worth playing.
A similar thing happened to my friend's son when he was learning to play tennis. Another parent -- not another child -- would talk very loudly about how uncoordinated some of the kids were and how they didn't belong on the court. These were children -- just learning to play!
And we wonder why kids would rather stay home in a contained environment and play video games ...
One of my former co-workers is a soccer official. He believes that kids would have a better time on the field and stick with it longer if parents were banned from watching. :)

llangeve
February 22nd, 2007, 2:04am
I don't know if this is the answer. I do think maybe more education (for both children and parents) would be good. Childhood obesity rates in this country are alarming and the rate of diabetes has shot up, kids are more sedentary, etc. Something need to be done about it and while BMI cards may not be the answer, we need to figure out what is, and fast.

Jessibear19
February 22nd, 2007, 2:17am
Kidsareus, great post! I think what sports in general in this country has become is very sad. With the way even professional sports has gone I'm not surprised, it seems more about who can get the biggest sponsorships or take the most steroids. Kids start out playing sports to have fun and feel like a part of something, and some parents have to take that and turn it into something ugly. It's no wonder most kids would rather curl up with their Playstations. I think if we went back to the concept of sports being a game it would be better for everyone involved. In 7th grade my friends and I were into cheerleading and all of us got along great, until the mothers started spreading rumors and trying to separate us into cliques..it's sad because until they got involved every single one of the girls got along and could just have fun together.

Poopie_doos
February 22nd, 2007, 2:55am
I have never heard of schools doing that. I'm sure if they checked my daughter, they'd send her home a greasy cheeseburger with her report because she's such a beanpole.

They would of done the same to me when I was kid. I was living off Twinkies and Little Debbie Snacks cakes. I didn't excercise. I was regulary served fatty foods. (That only changed after my father's heart attack.) I was skin and bones. Meanwhile I had a close friend that was overweight who nimbled carrot sticks and played in several sports. If she had been sent home with a card saying she was overweight it would of just made her feel worse than she already did.

Then I see the flip side of it. Some parents are too busy and too biased to look at their child objectively and realize they have a problem that needs to be dealt with. Schools will give a kid's parents the heads up if their child seems to be exhibiting signs of ADD so why can't they do the same regarding weight?

For all those out there that think schools should stop serving pizza and hot dogs are you willing to pay for the likely tax increase that will be needed to fund healthier menus?

hhcheung1000
February 22nd, 2007, 3:08am
I think that children shouldn't be tested for their BMI unless they're going to be wrestlers. But they should still continue to have some form of physical exercise to keep their heart rate going and their bodies healthy. Yet, I think more importantly, emphasis should be made on trying to improve the food that is being served to children. Instead of having pizza and hot dogs in childrens' cafeterias, they should opt for more healthy options so that children can continue to get the necessary nutrients they need to grow and concentrate better at school. That's just my opinion. Agree or disagree, but that's how I see it.

kmesh
February 22nd, 2007, 7:05am
I pack my childs lunch so I KNOW what she's eating. She doesn't care for school lunch anyway.

I do have to say, our exchange student from Germany is AMAZED at how many overweight kids there are in our high school! And their portrayal of us in America? We are all McDonalds eaters with big kitchens, and big living rooms with huge televisions!!! She was so glad that we do not fit that "description".

serendipity
February 22nd, 2007, 7:31am
our children do not make themselves fat..parents do...people start it when their kids are babys we develop their eating habits...and make our kids unhealthy...kids should not be overweight...I have an overweight friend and her 3 year old is 80 pounds already and her 4 month old is 25 pounds..I'm pretty sure the 4 month old aint making her own food and doing the grocery shopping picking out the junk...my friend is in total denial that her kid just has a healthy appetite...WRONG..everytime it cries she feeds it she has had it eating cereal and baby food since 2 weeks old..it is her fault that her children will get teased at school or develop a weight related illness...but as long as her kids stay out of her hair or the baby stops crying she feeds it...lazy parenting....thats all it is

piccadilly99
February 22nd, 2007, 7:50am
yikes! 4 months old and 25lbs! My son is 9 months and about that. My 7 year old is around 60. I'm slightly overweight and growing up we always had the soda and cookies. My kids never drink soda (they can't stand the taste anyway) they do have sweets in moderation but mostly yogurt, fruit, fruit snacks etc. I definately think it's the doctors job and not the schools in presenting it to parents.
Raising an obese child and letting them eat whatever they want is a form of child abuse in my opinion. The parent is setting the child up for a lifetime of medical trouble such as heart disease and diabetes when they could've been laying the groundwork for a healthy life.

Nubbs820
February 22nd, 2007, 9:29pm
our children do not make themselves fat..parents do...people start it when their kids are babys we develop their eating habits...and make our kids unhealthy...kids should not be overweight...I have an overweight friend and her 3 year old is 80 pounds already and her 4 month old is 25 pounds..I'm pretty sure the 4 month old aint making her own food and doing the grocery shopping picking out the junk...my friend is in total denial that her kid just has a healthy appetite...WRONG..everytime it cries she feeds it she has had it eating cereal and baby food since 2 weeks old..it is her fault that her children will get teased at school or develop a weight related illness...but as long as her kids stay out of her hair or the baby stops crying she feeds it...lazy parenting....thats all it is

My 3 year old was huge at 4 months. He was 20 something pounds. I'd have to get out his shot charts to find the exact amount. Well anyway, he wasn't fat besides normal baby fat. He was just BIG BIG BIG. He's now 3 years old in a 6t. He was 48 lbs and 47" tall at his 3 year checkup.

zelda
February 22nd, 2007, 9:33pm
yikes! 4 months old and 25lbs! My son is 9 months and about that. My 7 year old is around 60. I'm slightly overweight and growing up we always had the soda and cookies. My kids never drink soda (they can't stand the taste anyway) they do have sweets in moderation but mostly yogurt, fruit, fruit snacks etc. I definately think it's the doctors job and not the schools in presenting it to parents.
Raising an obese child and letting them eat whatever they want is a form of child abuse in my opinion. The parent is setting the child up for a lifetime of medical trouble such as heart disease and diabetes when they could've been laying the groundwork for a healthy life.



The problem there is some parents (the ones that are usually the problem) don't take their kids to the dr. unless they are made aware of a problem by the school. (sent home sick and school won't let them return til they are seen). I have known many parents like that.

nataliero
February 22nd, 2007, 9:37pm
I think the school's have better things to do than spending time focusing on the children's weight.

Angelharts
February 23rd, 2007, 11:00pm
Well our school just did the BMI here for my 8th grader. They did it with them all together. My daughter isnt overweight, but is heavier in weight than most of the kids, but she is 14 and almost 5'7" tall. The thing that made me mad was all the girls were freaking out about their weight and who was "skinny" and who wasn't. It drew so much attension to the whole weight issue. I was that heavy kid in middle school and freaked out going into highschool. I starved myself, threwup what I did eat and was finally "skinny". I still remember how thrilled everyone was at how great I looked. Little did they all know I about killed myself getting that way. I just hate to see so much attension put on the whole weight issue for younger teenage girls too. They have so many things going on with selfesteem the way it is at that age. Oh and lets not forget the commercial that is now running on TV. The one where the girl says I was a size 5 or 7 and WOW now I'm a size 2. OMG.. like telling everyone if you arent a size 2 you need to lose weight.. I hate that commercial. UGHHHHH

jenninshelby
February 23rd, 2007, 11:29pm
Well our school just did the BMI here for my 8th grader. They did it with them all together. My daughter isnt overweight, but is heavier in weight than most of the kids, but she is 14 and almost 5'7" tall. The thing that made me mad was all the girls were freaking out about their weight and who was "skinny" and who wasn't. It drew so much attension to the whole weight issue. I was that heavy kid in middle school and freaked out going into highschool. I starved myself, threwup what I did eat and was finally "skinny". I still remember how thrilled everyone was at how great I looked. Little did they all know I about killed myself getting that way. I just hate to see so much attension put on the whole weight issue for younger teenage girls too. They have so many things going on with selfesteem the way it is at that age. Oh and lets not forget the commercial that is now running on TV. The one where the girl says I was a size 5 or 7 and WOW now I'm a size 2. OMG.. like telling everyone if you arent a size 2 you need to lose weight.. I hate that commercial. UGHHHHH


That is so wrong.. If they are gonna do it? They really should not do it with them all together!! :frown3:

floridamom1990
February 24th, 2007, 12:39am
OMG, I truly HATE that commercial. Especially when she says "I felt SOOOO self-conscious at a size 7, and now look at me!" :worry:

Well our school just did the BMI here for my 8th grader. They did it with them all together. My daughter isnt overweight, but is heavier in weight than most of the kids, but she is 14 and almost 5'7" tall. The thing that made me mad was all the girls were freaking out about their weight and who was "skinny" and who wasn't. It drew so much attension to the whole weight issue. I was that heavy kid in middle school and freaked out going into highschool. I starved myself, threwup what I did eat and was finally "skinny". I still remember how thrilled everyone was at how great I looked. Little did they all know I about killed myself getting that way. I just hate to see so much attension put on the whole weight issue for younger teenage girls too. They have so many things going on with selfesteem the way it is at that age. Oh and lets not forget the commercial that is now running on TV. The one where the girl says I was a size 5 or 7 and WOW now I'm a size 2. OMG.. like telling everyone if you arent a size 2 you need to lose weight.. I hate that commercial. UGHHHHH